All posts by Memory Apata

NEW ENGLAND QUARTER NOTES: SEPTEMBER 2018, NO. 199

Message from the Chair
Fall 2018 Meeting Registration/Information
Seeking Nominations/Committee Members

Grant Awardees
NEMLA Officers
Publication Information

Message from the Chair

September, 2018

Dear NEMLA Members:

As with our last issue, the big news is still our joint meeting in Montreal with the New York State/Ontario chapter of MLA and the Quebec chapter (SQACBM) of the Canadian Association of Music Libraries, Archives and Documentation Centres (CAML). Registration is now open, and I hope to see many of you there on November 8 and 9 as we connect with our colleagues from further afield. Thank you to Tish Brennan for heading up the effort on travel grants, which makes this unique meeting more accessible to people early in their careers. More details on the winners appear later in this issue. Jared Rex, as past chair, has served with me on the working committee, focusing on coordinating the chapter webmasters to post the registration announcement. Thank you to Sarah Funke Donovan as the NEMLA representative to the program committee, particularly for the committee’s effective publicity and outreach. Proposals were slow to arrive, but the committee allayed our fears after the deadline when they wanted to expand the schedule to accommodate the deluge of worthy proposals.

I am quite pleased to see several NEMLA members on the Montreal program. I appreciate their willingness to both make the trip and to share their expertise to expand their their colleagues’ professional knowledge. This brings me to my next point, our efforts to get our members more involved in the chapter and MLA. I first took on leadership roles in high school organizations where turnover is constant, so I have a longstanding mindset of encouraging active membership. One of my favorite catchphrases from that era is, “The more you put into it, the more you get out of it.” The board has been working hard to make potential and new members feel welcome, but getting involved is a step further for new and veteran members. Activities such as serving on committees and in appointed and elected office and presenting at conferences benefit the chapter, MLA, and the profession as a whole. But you also benefit. There’s the obvious side of padding your resume, but presenting also enables you to build your professional network, especially outside your own workplace, developing new skills that you might not exercise in your day-to-day duties, and deepening your own understanding of your work when you present it to your peers.

I’ve learned from working on nominating committees and in other leadership roles that people are often reluctant to volunteer. On the flip side, I’ve definitely benefited from the encouragement of others to chair a committee, present at a meeting, take on a special role or run for office. So my advice to you is to say yes if asked to do more. But also be willing to stick your hand in the air, maybe embracing your inner Lisa Simpson, and volunteer before being asked when opportunities arise. Jared Rex will report on committee openings in this issue, so here’s your first chance.

Finally, a note on membership renewals, which are due soon. You may notice that we no longer offer a 3-year membership option. We have made this change to simplify accounting as we pursue shifting from collecting our own dues to managing membership activities through the MLA website. We’ll have much more on this in upcoming newsletters, but I want to answer three questions up front that are likely to arise. First, we will continue to offer standalone membership to NEMLA without joining MLA. Second, although the 3-year membership option has been our practice for many years, it is not a formal policy that requires a membership vote on a by-laws change. Third, our finances are stable enough that the board did not even suggest increasing dues; dues have remained the same for at least 6 years, so the prepaid option has not been useful as a hedge against inflation.

Marci Cohen, Chair, New England Music Library Association

Assistant Head, Music Library, Boston University

Fall 2018 Meeting Registration/Information

Registration

File:McGill faculty Music department.JPG
The exterior of McGill’s New Music Building, which houses the Marvin Duchow Music Library. Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:McGill_faculty_Music_department.JPG

Registration is now open for the joint meeting of the New York State-Ontario (NYS/O) and New England (NEMLA) Chapters of the Music Library Association and the Québec Chapter of the Canadian Association of Music Libraries, Archives and Documentation Centres (SQACBM). The meeting will be held at McGill University’s New Residence Hall in Montreal, Quebec on Thursday, November 8 and Friday November 9, 2018. We are pleased to announce that the MLA Board of Directors will also be joining us for this international conference.

Regular registration: $75 CAN / $60 USD

Student registration: $25 CAN / $20 USD.

Registration deadline: Friday, Nov. 2

To register:

Attendees who are not members of any of these chapters may use whichever chapter registration they prefer. SQACBM registration is in Canadian dollars; NEMLA and NYSO registrations are in US dollars.

NEMLA members

NYSO members

SQACBM members

Please also indicate your meal preferences here.

Passport Reminder 

Please be advised that attendees from the U.S. will need a valid passport to enter Canada.

Hotel

We have a block of rooms reserved at the Hilton Garden Inn Montreal Centre-Ville, 380 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 0B1, Canada. Make your reservations by September 26 for the discounted rate of $179 CAD. The rate is available for Nov. 7-11, but you may choose a shorter stay when making reservations.

Link for reservation: http://group.hiltongardeninn.com/MusicLibraryAssociation

Parking near the McGill New Residence Hall: https://ca.parkindigo.com/en/car-park/place-du-parc

Looking for a Roommate?

Click here to indicate which nights you would like to share accommodations.

Traveling by Car or Looking for a Ride?

Click here to find a ride or offer a ride to Montreal for the NEMLA/NYSO/SQACBM Joint Meeting!

Preliminary Program

Except as noted, all events will be held at the New Residence Hall located at 3625 ave du Parc, Montreal, Quebec, H2X 3P8, Tel: (514) 398-3471.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8
9:00 – 10:00 Breakfast and Networking
10:00 – 10:30 Welcome and Thanks
10:30 – 11:00 Morning Session 1a – Putting the “I”s in RIdIM: International Involvement and Iconographic Images in the RIdIM Database by Alan Green and Sean Ferguson

The RIdIM Database of Performing Arts in Visual Culture is poised to be a vital part of the global arts and humanities landscape. It is free to access at db.ridim.org, offering an ever-expanding variety of visual culture items (more than 3,000, and growing). Increasingly, image files from many museums and other institutions can be uploaded and viewed directly in the database, following emerging standards for public domain usage. The database supports text in any language and script, provides established lists of names and places, and includes an extensive international vocabulary of musical instruments, based on the multilingual thesaurus developed by the Musical Instrument Museums Online (MIMO). This presentation highlights the growing and planned international coverage of the database, thanks to the recent cataloguing efforts of numerous individual participants and shared data from partner projects.  We invite new database content by welcoming individuals to catalogue works of personal interest and familiarity. RIdIM aims to include art works of all types, time periods and places, in the database, so that the possibilities for participation are vast. In addition to the database style guide, and support from the RIdIM Editorial Center staff, new tutorial materials are available in text and video formats to assist cataloguers in creating database entries.

11:00 – 11:30 Morning Session 1b – How a MediaWiki Archive Can Support Creative Research in Music by Catherine Henderson

The Ecstasies of Influence project at Matralab, a research center at Concordia University, explores whether creative strategies from various artistic domains can be transferred into music creation. For example, can music be composed the way a poet arranges words, or a visual artist conceives an installation? Teams of artist-researchers in Montreal, Berlin, and Pune (India) are engaging with artists from various disciplines to learn their creative processes and aesthetic strategies, to try and apply them to musical composition.

To document the process, video recordings are made of the discussions, workshops, rehearsals, and performances. However, how do we preserve these multimedia research materials for reuse throughout the project and in the future?

This paper discusses the process of determining the archival needs of
the project and users, and why MediaWiki was selected as the best platform for a searchable and browsable database. It also discusses how a taxonomy was established for an in-progress research project, and the challenges of managing information for an interdisciplinary and multi-national music research project.

11:30 – 12:00 Morning Session 1c – Developing user-centered tools and services for supporting digital musicology/Musicologie numérique : développement d’outils et de services centrés sur l’utilisateur by Audrey Laplante and Jean-Sébastien Sauvé (bilingual)

In this presentation, we will discuss the role academic libraries can play in supporting digital musicology by providing examples of successful library initiatives to support digital humanities. We will then advocate for libraries who wish to play a greater role in supporting digital musicology scholarship to use scholarly primitives as a conceptual framework for gaining an in-depth understanding of the research practices of music scholars and hence develop facilities and services that will meet their needs. Coined by Unsworth in 2000, the term ‘scholarly primitives’ refers to the “basic functions common to scholarly activity across disciplines, over time, and independent of theoretical orientation.” By looking at these basic functions, it becomes easier to identify where libraries could help scholars overcome some of the barriers they face during the research process. The presentation will also include a review of the empirical literature on scholarly primitives of humanities scholars and on the scholarly behaviour of music and arts scholars. Based on this review, we will propose a list of scholarly primitives for musicologists grounded in empirical data.

12:00 – 1:30 Lunch on your own
1:30 – 2:00 Afternoon Session 1a – The well-tempered catalogue – the new RDA Toolkit and music resources by Damian Iseminger and Daniel Paradis

After nearly two years of re-design and re-structuring, the new version of the RDA Toolkit, the international standard used by many music libraries for cataloguing, was released on 13 June 2018. This new version, while looking completely different from past versions of the Toolkit, implemented concepts from the IFLA Library Reference Model, the consolidation of the FRBR, FRAD, and FRSAD conceptual models. This paper will detail the many changes to the RDA Toolkit, the possible impact of the changes on music cataloguing practices, and the role that translations of the Toolkit will play in helping diverse international communities implement the new RDA Toolkit.

2:00 – 2:30 Afternoon Session 1b – Can I listen to that online: Building AV Access Systems by Jonathan Manton

This session will discuss how music librarians can be actively involved in the process of scoping and designing digital audiovisual (AV) access systems or the AV components of larger digital access systems. It will outline how music librarians can be involved in the creation of requirements, often based on end user research, as well as the development prioritization process for these systems.

2:30 – 3:00 Afternoon Session 1c – Reprints: Views of a Publisher and User by Ronald Broude

Reprints (using the term broadly to cover any photolithographic reproduction of an existing publication or document) are an often misunderstood form of publication, scorned by some scholars and publishers and praised by many who use them. Now, when reprints are being replaced by various digital forms of publication, is an opportune moment to review the reprint phenomenon, both to offer a history and to propose much-needed definitions.

During the twentieth century, reprints made important contributions to both music and the study of music. During and after World War II, reprints were essential to professionals and amateurs seeking editions of standard repertoire. With the post-war expansion of colleges and universities, reprints provided access to important scholarship and to what were then standard editions. And reprints provided the Early Music community with the possibility of playing Renaissance and Baroque works in the forms in which they were originally published.

This paper offers the views of someone who has been both a publisher whose catalogue contained several hundred reprints and a scholar who made use of reprints in his own research.

3:00 – 3:30 Break and Networking
3:30 – 4:00 Afternoon Session 2a – Acquisition, access, and preservation of eScores: A new model for the library-music publisher collaborations by Brian McDonagh, Kyla Jemison, and Houman Behzadi

The music score publishing industry has maintained its traditional strongholds and print continues to dominate the market.  The notable developments in electronic music score (eScore) publishing have for the most part targeted individual end users and their personal needs, leaving out libraries whose mandate is to collect, disseminate, and preserve for future generations.  A few for-profit aggregators have produced packages of copyrighted eScores that are available to libraries for rent or purchase.  These packages, however, have not been curated by music librarians and lack an awareness of library users’ needs, so their long-term value is questionable.  Fear of widespread piracy, disconnect between music librarians and publishers, and the absence of sustainable acquisition models are the major factors delaying the emergence of eScore as a viable format in music library collections.

In this presentation, we will introduce an alternative model of acquisition that involves close collaborations between a publisher of Canadian art music, Plangere Editions (PE), and the University of Toronto Libraries.  Our end goal is to acquire, provide access for authorized users, and preserve the eScore version of PE’s publications, for which we have purchased print equivalents in the past.  Aside from the scope of the current project, the workflow that we are implementing to do this work is scalable and can be used for collaborations with other music publishers.  Furthermore, the workflow has inherent potential for collaborative collection development among music libraries in Ontario and beyond.  The project is the first of its kind in Canada. 

4:00 – 4:430 Afternoon Session 2b – Libraries as Printers: Challenges of acquiring PDF music scores/parts from self-publishing composers by Lisa Philpott

While the electronic publishing of books and scores has become commonplace, e-publishing of scores by major music publishers has lagged-behind. Libraries and music publishers are unwilling to relinquish the print format, but the proliferation of music notation software has given rise to greater numbers of self-publishing composers, keen to sell and deliver their musical works in PDF.

The Music Library at the University of Western Ontario is an anomaly, in that it acquires, catalogues, and circulates music for the Faculty of Music’s choirs and large ensembles. A faculty member’s request to participate in a large-scale commission of a new work for wind ensemble in 2011 was approved; when the work was completed, the score and parts arrived as PDFs contained in zip-files: we suddenly found ourselves in the printing business.

Since 2011, we have continued to acquire music in PDF for our choirs and ensembles, eventually developing a work-flow and suggestions for best practices for dealing with these materials.

4:30 – 5:00 Afternoon Session 2c – When a Consortium isn’t enough: Sheet music in a 21st century reading by Andrea Cawelti

The Sheet Music Consortium has been providing access to diverse collections since 2003. When it works, both bibliographic information and scans can be retrieved, but the searching access is not ideal for today’s users. Administered through UCLA, ingestion of new materials is not always easy for busy staff to manage. But their Digital Library Program has turned new attention to the Consortium, and change is in the wind. Join Andrea Cawelti for a presentation on new developments, some interpretive materials now available, and a look at what we can do with sheet music in 2018!

5:00 – 5:30 Travel to Marvin Duchow Music Library
5:30 – 7:00 Reception/Exhibition at the Marvin Duchow Music Library
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9
8:00 – 9:00 Breakfast and Networking
9:00 – 9:30 Morning Session 1a – Women in the 18th-Century British Music Marketplace: A View from the Subscription Lists by Joseph Darby

Although subscription music publications represent a small fraction of the overall music market in eighteenth-century Britain, scholars are increasingly using lists of subscribers to study the intersection of composers, audiences, and the music publishing industry. Detailed examination of subscription lists, for example, may be used to sharpen our knowledge of women’s involvement in the musical life of eighteenth-century Britain – as composers, consumers, performers, and publishers. The subscription method generally involved a buyer’s payment (or promise of payment) in advance of publication. In return, the subscriber was often rewarded with a discount on the retail price and her/his name inscribed in the work’s first edition on a list of subscribers. This paper provides results of a comprehensive study of subscription lists to over 450 music publications from eighteenth-century Britain. Data generated from these lists document the substantial influence and success of women in the music marketplace as the century progressed. Women accounted for a sizable share of subscribers to a wide range of music genres, and women composers often outpaced their male counterparts in subscription sales, especially with respect to songs (e.g., A.M. Hodges, E. Turner, F.E. Hodges) and keyboard music (e.g., M. Forrest, J.M. Guest, C.M. Barthélemon).

9:30 – 10:00 Morning Session 1b – The Long, Long Trail: An Iconic World War I Song and How It Came to Be by Suzanne Eggleston Lovejoy

November 11, 2018 will mark the Centenary of the Armistice ending World War I. One of the iconic songs, “There’s a Long, Long Trail A-Winding” by Zo Elliott and Stoddard King is still used to signify the music sung by soldiers in camp and in the trenches during the war. It turns up in a variety of films, television shows, and events commemorating the war. It was composed by two college students, and eventually published, yet were it not for the singing of some Canadian soldiers, it might not have become a cornerstone of the musical repertory of the military from the British Empire and the United States. There is another oddity concerning the song—it exists in two versions. The original, more familiar to British Tommies, has nearly been forgotten. And this has implications for the authenticity of the today’s performances. The presentation will draw on archival documentation from the Zo Elliott Papers at Yale University, contemporary accounts, and audio and video excerpts, both historical and contemporary. It is hoped that a Canadian audience may help to suggest resources for carrying this research forward.

10:00 – 10:30 Morning Session 1c – Discographic Metadata as a Research Resource for Studying Popular Music Genres: Introducing the SongData Project by Jada Watson

This paper introduces the SongData Project, which harnesses the potential of discographic metadata to create new opportunities for popular music research. Adopting methods for Big Data research in the humanities (Moretti 2005), and influenced by the collaborative “Big Data History of Music” project (which includes scholars and librarians at Royal Holloway, University of London, and the British Library), this project develops approaches for the collection and organization of discographic and biographic metadata in order to explore the connections between music and broader socio-cultural and institutional frameworks over time. In this way, the project connects relevant data to reveal the connections and patterns that influence historical processes.

This paper outlines the work underway to develop a comprehensive dataset of country music singles from Billboard’s Hot Country Songs classification list (1944-2017). The project dataset has been enhanced with biographic information about the broader network of artists involved in the creative process in order to facilitate queries about the relationships between songwriters, performers, and producers involved in the creation of country music. After discussing some of the technical challenges of data curation, it demonstrates how analysis and visualization of this type of data can transform musicological understandings of genre.

10:30 – 10:45 Coffee Break
10:45 – 12:00 Panel: Current issues and future directions in music librarianship by Mark C. McKnight, Susannah Cleveland, Carolyn Doi, and Joseph Hafner

In the age of the Internet, communication has advanced to unimaginable heights and modes of access to information have been revolutionized.  While the traditional core mandates of libraries – provision and maintenance of access to curated information – remain relevant, the very meanings of library and library services are under constant revision and scrutiny.  In this relatively unstable environment, music libraries have been navigating the change, at times along with the larger library community, and at others on their own given their somewhat unique nature.  Music has posed, and continue to bring forward, its own set of challenges encompassing a myriad of issues, but also future opportunities that require the omnipresent involvement and strong leadership of music librarians.  Therefore, the definition of music librarianship is also evolving to incorporate many more aspects that are increasingly part of the day-to-day life of a music librarian.

Considering all this change and the need for its successful navigation, an understanding of the larger directions of music librarianship seems highly valuable.  Every music librarian, regardless of their field of expertise, would benefit from the “larger picture” or a global view of the current issues and future directions in music librarianship.  The proposed panel, comprised of the leaders of the International and two national music library associations, aims to discuss a number of issues that music librarians encounter today and those in the horizon, for which they must prepare.

12:00 – 1:30 Catered Lunch
1:30 – 2:30 NYSO and SQACBM Business Meetings
2:30 – 3:00 Break and Networking
3:00 – 3:30 Afternoon Session 1a – The Magic Wand Question: Library Enhancements Sparked by Student Survey by Lenora Schneller

As part of Cornell University Library’s Fall 2017 survey about library services, spaces, and collections, undergraduate students were asked, “If you had a magic wand, how would you improve the library?” Inspired by responses from Music Library users, we identified several ways we could highlight resources and better help our patrons navigate the collection. This presentation will illustrate resulting improvements in signage, placement of stacks maps, promotion of special collections materials, streamed video resources, and on-demand tours, as well as ideas for programs to increase interaction with students. Where available, user statistics reflecting the changes will be included.

3:30 – 4:00 Afternoon Session 1b – Local music collecting in Canadian cultural heritage institutions: A summary of recent research by Carolyn Doi and Sean Luyk

Local music provides evidence of community norms and insight into broader historical and cultural contexts. Collections of local music represent delimited geographic regions through documentary artifacts such as sound recordings, printed ephemera, historical and archival materials. Increasingly, cultural heritage institutions are preserving and collecting local music, although these practices are under documented in scholarly and professional literatures.

This presentation describes a SSHRC-funded research project, Sounds of Home: Exploring Local Music Collections and Collecting in Canada that aims to:
1) identify where collections of local music are held, what music(s) they document, and what evidentiary value they possess;
2) understand the perceived value of collecting local music, and
3) record local music collection management practices currently used by public institutions to determine areas where practices may be improved.

We will present the summary of a survey, which was distributed to local music collectors in Canadian libraries in 2018. The survey results provide an overview of current trends, challenges, and strategies faced by local music collection managers in Canadian libraries. We will also give a project update, including plans for next steps which include interviews with collection managers as well as an overview of local music collection in Canadian cultural heritage institutions.

4:00 – 4:30 Afternoon Session 1c – Highlighted Collections: Bagaduce Music Lending Library (Maine), Downtown Collection (NYU) and the Louis Achille Delaquerrière Scrapbook (UWO)

An overview of the collections of the Bagaduce Music Lending Library (Maine), the Downtown Collection at New York University, and the Louis Delaquerrière Scrapbook at the University of Western Ontario.

4:30 – 5:00 Tentative: Travel to guided tour
5:00 – 7:00 Tentative: Guided tour

Transportation

By air:

Pierre-Elliot Trudeau Airport: https://www.admtl.com/en

Taxi and limousines: https://www.admtl.com/en/access/taxis-limousines

Other transportation services: https://www.admtl.com/en/access/transports

By car: https://www.mtl.org/en/plan/getting-here/montreal-by-car

Looking for a Ride?

Click here to find a ride or offer a ride to Montreal for the NEMLA/NYSO/SQACBM Joint Meeting!

By train:

From a US destination: https://www.amtrak.com/home.html

From a Canadian destination: https://www.viarail.ca/en/

By bus:

Greyhound: https://www.greyhound.com

Megabus (limited coverage): https://ca.megabus.com

Restaurants near the conference venue:

Première moisson (Accessible from within in the conference building)

333 Prince Arthur St W, Montreal, QC H2X 3P8

St-Hubert Express (take-out)

3575 Park Ave, Montreal, QC H2X 3P9

Wing Fa Chinese restaurant

3474 Park Ave, Montreal, QC H2X 2H7

Amelia’s Pizza

201 Milton St, Montreal, QC H2X 1V5

Tourism Montreal

English

French

Concerts

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7, 2018 THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2018 FRIDAY, NOV. 9, 2018 SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 2018
Orchestre symphonique de Montréal Blake Pouliot plays the Sibelius concerto, 8 pm
Opéra de Montréal Das Rheingold, 7:30 pm
McGill Baroque Orchestra Works by Giovanni Gabrieli, Biagio Marini, Giovanni Battista Fontana, 7:30 PM at Redpath Hall(3461 rue McTavish, Montreal)
Opera McGill Benjamin Britten, Albert Herring; 7:30 PM at Pollack Hall, Strathcona Music Building(555 rue Sherbrooke Ouest, Montreal) Benjamin Britten, Albert Herring; 7:30 PM at Pollack Hall, Strathcona Music Building(555 rue Sherbrooke Ouest, Montreal) Benjamin Britten, Albert Herring; 7:30 PM at Pollack Hall, Strathcona Music Building(555 rue Sherbrooke Ouest, Montreal)
Intermezzo: Ali Kian Yazdanfar, double bass & Brigitte Poulin, piano Works by Onslow, Weinberg, and Bottesini; 12:00 PM at Tanna Schulich Hall, Elizabeth Wirth Music Building(527 rue Sherbrooke Ouest, Montreal)
McGill Noon-Hour Organ concert Hans-Ola Ericsson, coordinator, 12:30 PM at Redpath Hall (3461 rue McTavish, Montreal)

Recommended Museums

Montreal Museum of Fine ArtsMusée des beaux-arts de Montréal

McCord MuseumMusée McCord

Pointe-à-Callière

Meeting organization working group members

Houman Behzadi, NYSO and SQACBM

Cathy Martin, SQACBM

Lenora Schneller, NYSO

Jared Rex, NEMLA

Marci Cohen, NEMLA

In liaison with:

Rachel Gagnon, SQACBM

Christiane Melançon, SQACBM

Catherine Jolicoeur, SQACBM

Jim Farrington, NYSO

Beth Anne Kelly, NYSO

Jennifer L. Vaughn, NYSO

Sarah Funke Donovan, NEMLA

Alan Karass, NEMLA

Lisa Wollenberg. NEMLA

Grant Awardees

We are pleased to announce the winners of the Fall 2018 Meeting Travel Grant:

Patrick Quinn has held the position of Instruction and Reserves Coordinator on the staff of the Music Library, Boston University, since Fall 2016, having graduated from Columbia State University’s Schwob School of Music with an MM in Oboe Performance the previous May.  He is a 2014 summa cum laude graduate of UNH with a BA in Music Performance.  Patrick noted in his grant application that he hopes attendance at the Montreal meeting will allow him to “further my understanding of the current state of music librarianship ….and [provide] a glimpse into music librarianship on a more international level…”  Hearty congratulations on your award!

Adaliz Cruz has just begun her first year in the Master’s program in Library and Information Science at Simmons University. Originally from Mayagüez, Puerto Rico, Adaliz earned a B.M. in Applied Classical Music (Flute) from the Inter American University of Puerto Rico. During an exchange semester at Queens College (CUNY) in 2015, she worked in their Benjamin Rosenthal Library. Adaliz attended the Spring NEMLA meeting at NEC as part of the First-Time Attendee program. This past summer, she was an intern at NEC’s Blumenthal Family Library.

First-Time Attendees

If this is your first NEMLA meeting, we welcome you to apply for our First-Time Attendees Program. For the Fall 2018 Meeting, this grant covers the registration fee for the meeting. Both current members and non-members are eligible to apply, so long as they have not attended a meeting before. The deadline to apply for funding through this program is Oct. 26, 2018. Please apply here.  Also note that funding is regrettably not available for all first-time attendees, but we do strive to accommodate as many as we can on a first come, first served basis.

Seeking Nominations

Dear NEMLA members,

We currently have many vacancies on nearly every committee. Serving on a committee is a wonderful opportunity to easily get involved in our chapter. Committees are the lifeblood of NEMLA, and we are thankful for the talents and expertise committee members bring to our work in music librarianship in New England.

The following committees are seeking new members:

  • Nominating Committee (1 new member)
  • Program Committee (1 new member)
  • Education and Outreach Committee (2 new members)
  • Technical Services Committee (1 new member)
  • Publications Committee (1 chair; 1 new member)
  • Instruction Committee (1 chair; 2-3 new members)

If you have not recently served on a committee–or if you have served on one of our committees in the past–I encourage you to consider serving our organization on a new committee. Please contact me if you are interested in serving in this capacity, and I thank you in advance for your consideration.

Jared Rex, Past Chair, New England Music Library Association

NEMLA Officers

 

Chair:
Marci Cohen
Assistant Head
Music Library
Boston University
771 Commonwealth Ave.
Boston, MA 02215
mcohen2 at bu.edu
(617) 353-3707
Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect:
Sarah Funke Donovan
Associate Archivist for Digital Assets
Boston Symphony Orchestra
301 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
sdonovan at bso.org
(617) 638-9452
Past Chair:
Jared Rex
Music Librarian
Fenwick Music Library
College of the Holy Cross
1 College Street
Worcester, MA 01610
jrex at holycross.edu
(508) 793-2295
Secretary-Treasurer:Alan Karass
Alan Karass
Director of Libraries
New England Conservatory
290 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115-5018
alan.karass at necmusic.edu
(617) 585-1247
Member-At-Large:
Patricia (Tish) Brennan
Associate Professor/Head of Reference
James P. Adams Library
Rhode Island College
600 Mt Pleasant Ave
Providence, RI 02908
pbrennan at ric.edu
(401) 456-2810
Newsletter Editor:Memory Apata
Memory Apata
Music & Performing Arts Librarian
Dartmouth College
Paddock Music Library
Hopkins Center, HB 6245 Hanover, NH 03755
memory.r.apata at dartmouth.edu
(603) 646-3234
Sofia Becerra-LichaNEMLA Archivist:
Sofia Becerra-Licha
Archivist
Stan Getz Library
Berklee College of Music
1140 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02215
sbecerralicha at berklee.edu
Office: (617)747-8001
Website Editor:
Lisa Wollenberg
Public Services Librarian
Allen Library
University of Hartford
200 Bloomfield Ave
West Hartford, CT 06117
lwollenbe at hartford.edu
Office: (860) 768-4840

Publication Information:

New England Quarter Notes is published quarterly in September, December, March/April and June/July.
Back issues may be accessed from:
http://nemla.musiclibraryassoc.org/resources/newsletters/

Address all correspondence concerning editorial matters to:
Memory Apata
memory.r.apata@dartmouth.edu

Inquiries concerning subscription, membership and change of address should be directed to:
Alan Karass
alan.karass@necmusic.edu

Membership year runs September to August.
Regular Personal Membership:$12.00
Student and Retired Membership:$6.00
Institutional Membership$16.00

Return to the New England Music Library Association home page.

NEW ENGLAND QUARTER NOTES: JULY 2018, NO. 198

Message from the Chair
Spring 2018 Meeting Summary
Secretary/Treasurer’s Report
Fall 2018 Meeting Preview
Fall Meeting Travel Grant Application
Fall Meeting Call for Proposals
Noteworthy News
NEMLA Officers
Publication Information

Message from the Chair

July, 2018

Dear NEMLA members:

Get your passports ready! During the spring meeting at the New England Conservatory (NEC) in March, outgoing chapter chair Jared Rex shared the exciting news that our fall meeting would be held in Montreal jointly with the New York State/Ontario chapter of MLA and the Quebec chapter (SQACBM) of the Canadian Association of Music Libraries, Archives and Documentation Centres (CAML). Jared had announced that the Greater New York chapter of MLA would also participate, but they have since decided to drop out. The meeting will be held at McGill University’s New Residence on Thursday, November 8 and Friday, November 9, which we chose because it leads into the long Veteran’s Day weekend observed in the U.S.

We realize that this will be a more expensive meeting for our members for a variety of reasons, but we are working on ways to make it affordable, starting with making it possible to stay only a single night in Montreal. The event will begin Thursday morning with French-language presentations, but bilingual welcome messages and English-language presentations won’t start until Thursday afternoon. The event will wrap up mid-afternoon on Friday. The registration price, $60 US, will include breakfast on Thursday and Friday, a reception at the end of the Thursday program, Friday lunch, and numerous catered coffee breaks. We will have a block of discounted rooms ($179 CAD) at the Hilton Garden Inn Montreal Centre-Ville Hotel, right across from McGill’s music library. Most importantly, we have travel grants available for up to three people, described in greater detail elsewhere in the newsletter.

To balance the expense and inconvenience of the Montreal meeting, the NEMLA board decided when we signed on that our spring 2019 meeting should be in Boston to be accessible to as many of our members as possible. I am happy to announce that my own institution, Boston University, will host the Spring 2019 meeting. We still have a lot to focus on before then, so we have not yet set a date.

We expect there will be a competitive process for selecting presentations. Don’t be shy about responding to the call for proposals. I hope NEMLA will be well-represented among the presenters.

To recap election announcements from Jared, I offer congratulations to our winners, Sarah Funke Donovan of the Boston Symphony Orchestra as our new Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect and Patricia B. M. “Tish” Brennan of Rhode Island College as our new Member-at-Large. I thank Laura Stokes, Past Chair, and Jonathan Manton, Member-at-Large, for their work as they cycle off the Board, and Jared Rex for all his guidance as he transitions to Past Chair. I thank Ruthann McTyre, Elizabeth Berndt-Morris and Sara White for their willingness to run for our elected positions. Finally, I thank Lisa Wollenberg of the University of Hartford as our new web editor, and I thank Sarah Hunter of Boston University as she steps down from that role, one she continued to hold even when her job duties moved away from music librarianship. As program chair for the NEC meeting, I am proud of the well-attended and informative event. I particularly appreciate Alan Karass, who pulled double duty as both our Secretary/Treasurer and our site host. It is clear why Alan was eager to show off NEC’s new library and other spaces, and the whole library staff was extremely hospitable.

I look forward to serving you as the chapter chair, and I am excited about all we have lined up.

Respectfully submitted,

Marci Cohen, Chair, New England Music Library Association
Assistant Head, Music Library, Boston University

Spring 2018 Meeting Summary

23 March, 2018

Pierce Hall, New England Conservatory

The morning began with opening remarks from Jared Rex, NEMLA Chair. Then attendees were greeted enthusiastically by Tom Novak, NEC Interim President, Provost, and Dean, a person who clearly has no room for any more “hats.”

Following introductory remarks, the first session, “Bound for Glory: Cataloging Bound Sheet Music as Collections” was given by Robert Cunningham of the Boston Public Library and Andrea Cawelti of Harvard University. Attendees were led through the steps of a project to create effective and efficient cataloguing workflow for bound collections of (mostly) sheet music.  The descriptive problems presented by these often miscellaneous groupings of compositions– whose only common element may be that they had a single owner who chose to have them bound together in a volume– were described with enthusiasm and wry humor by the team of Cunningham and Cawelti. The creator/owners of these unique collections sometimes turn out to be people of import or significance in some realm of endeavor (perhaps even music!) such as Julia Ward Howe, but others are more obscure and will require research effort beyond established works of authority.  Robert specifically mentioned the use of Ancestry (Library Edition) as well as Family Search (sponsored by the Church of the Latter-Day Saints) as useful personal identification resources. Following the meeting, it has been confirmed by Andrea that Harvard’s collection records are on ArchiveGrid, but that this would be dependent on the searcher’s individual institutional profile. Those interested in complete details of these cataloguing best practices are encouraged to contact Andrea [ cawelti@fas.harvard.edu ] and/or Robert [ rcunningham@bpl.org ] for the latest copy of the procedures.

The next presentation was given by Jean Wald of Stetson University. In “Pianists Speak: The Interviews of Robert Dumm, 1959-2008,” Jean outlined the challenges of working with a special collection in the absence of dedicated archival staff, lack of time away from primary duties for the non-archivist, adequate secure space for research and storage, and lack of funds for materials and staff. Despite the bumpy road, Jean enriched our picture of the pianistic world by working with nearly 400 oral history interviews making up the principle part of the Robert Dumm Collection at Stetson University.  Dumm (1928-2012), once Dean at Boston Conservatory in his early career, spent over 40 years interviewing a wide array of “pianistic” personalities, mainly performers but also composers, piano pedagogues and their students both famous and obscure, competition winners, piano makers, piano tuners, and various others. The renown of these individuals varied from luminaries like Van Cliburn and Nicolas Slonimsky, to local piano teachers who had attended master classes Dumm held throughout the US and Canada.  Regardless of the logistical and support challenges, Jean continues to move forward with arranging, cataloguing, and digitizing these recordings and their transcriptions for future students and scholars. View the collection description here.

After these presentations, Jared Rex opened the business meeting by welcoming the first-time attendees and announcing the current openings on NEMLA committees. Jonathan Manton then reported on his activities as Member-at-Large including the administration of the MLA Annual Meeting Travel Grant and the Public Library Panel at the Spring 2017 Meeting at MIT. Sofía Becerra-Licha put out a call for institutions willing to host the NEMLA Archives. Alan Karass submitted the Treasurer’s report (provided below). Marci Cohen put out a call for mentees for the NEMLA First-Time Attendee program. Jared then discussed the possibility of transforming the current committee structure to a communities-of-interest model. He also shared preliminary information on the Fall Meeting in Montreal—a joint meeting with NYSO and SQACBM. He announced the election results including our new Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect, Sarah Funke Donovan and new Member-at-Large, Patricia B. M. “Tish” Brennan. Jared also announced that Lisa Wollenberg will be assuming the role of Webpage Editor and thanked Sarah Hunter for her years of service in that position. The gavel was then smoothly passed from Jared Rex, now Past Chair, to Marci Cohen as incoming chapter Chair, who promptly adjourned the meeting for lunch.

Upon our return to NEC, a panel discussion was held titled, “Migrating to a New Integrated Library System (ILS) and Discovery Layer: Perspectives from the Trenches.” Stage-setting for the panel topic was provided by Anne Adams, Chair of the NEMLA Technical Services Committee (TSC), who explained that numerous libraries in New England have migrated from one library services platform to another in the recent past. The TSC wanted to provide chapter members with an overview of the process as well as words of advice (and possibly warning) from those recently in the trenches. Panelists included Michael Rogan of Tufts (migrated June 2017 from III a.k.a. Innovative to ExLibris Alma/Primo), Tish Brennan of Rhode Island College (migrated December 2016 from Innovative to OCLC Worldshare Management System (WMS)/Discovery in a consortium environment), Rebecca McCallum & Alec McLane of Wesleyan (migrated July 2017 from Voyager to ExLibris Alma/Primo in a consortium environment) and Andrea Cawelti of Harvard University (scheduled for migration July 2018 from HOLLIS Classic (Aleph) to ExLibris Alma/Primo). Some aspects of each institution’s experience including pre-migration planning and preparation, data clean-up, and post-migration “chestnuts”, including handling of material types, faceting, searching EBSCO databases, and authorized access points as well as the user interface were discussed. The wealth of experiential information provided by the panel was formidable.  Some panel members expressed that there is and will be more data clean-up than they first imagined or plan for, including not just bibliographic data, but acquisitions & financial data and patron data. They advised considering a year of mapping and clean-up, a year of testing, implementation and training, and at least a year of post-migration surprises and further clean-up. Ideally, one would imagine in advance all possible anomalies in how a new system will translate technical services information into public services information in a way different from a familiar old system to ensure patrons do not lose access to essential features or information on which they have come to rely. This is unfortunately virtually impossible to attain.  Each of the panelist’s institutions experienced post-migration “Yikes!” discoveries including data which did not migrate properly, data which was not indexed or is otherwise now unsearchable or un-browsable, data which was not displaying as anticipated, faceting working counterintuitively to patron expectations, “discovery” software obscuring essential catalog information or unable to harness the robust metadata of the underlying databases creating inaccurate results for patrons, and other problematic issues. All the panelists agreed that music librarians need to make their voices heard to their library system vendors, not just as individual customer institutions, but collectively through the MLA User Group structure. Librarians should also take advantage of mechanisms provided by the vendor (such as a community center for requesting changes/fixes) to vote for improvements and enhancements. There is greater power to effect change in collective action so librarians should not be shy about asking fellow music users of that vendor to vote or endorse their requests.

The afternoon continued with tours of the Blumenthal Family Library and the SLPC followed by a concert including setar Improvisation by Nima Janmohammadi, and a performance of Ciaccona (2015) by Cody Forrest, violin. The concert ended with Invocation (2017) for String Quartet by Cody Forrest, performed by Chu Chun Jean Huang and Shuxiang Yang, violins, Daniel Orsen, viola, and Joseph Gotoff, cello. The audio fidelity of YouTube can only present a glimmer of these exciting recent compositions. The meeting closed with a reception.

Recordings of the proceedings for this meeting may be found on NEMLA’s YouTube channel.

Secretary/Treasurer’s Report

Balances (3/23/18)

Checking: $4,280.49

Savings: $4,006.63

Total: $8,287.12

Oral History Grant

Beginning amount $1,000

Expenses since 2015: $519.50

Current remaining: $480.50

Checking Account

Restricted funds (grant): $480.50

Unrestricted/NEMLA (non-grant): $3,799.99

Income from memberships paid this report period (8/1/17-3/23/18): $1,072

October 2017 Meeting

Expenses: $681

First-time attendees: 2

Registrations: 51

March 2018 Meeting

Expenses: $1,014.98

First-time attendees: 5

Registrations: 64

Fees

Eventbrite (meeting registrations): $232.04

PayPal (memberships paid online): $44.12

Fall 2018 Meeting Preview

McGill University, Montreal, QC

Thursday and Friday, November 8-9, 2018

Strathcona music building of McGill University, Montreal. Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Strathcona_music_building_(McGill_University)_2005-10-21.JPG

NEMLA is going to Canada! The New England (NEMLA) and New York State/Ontario Chapters (NYSO) of the Music Library Association, together with the Québec Chapter of the Canadian Association of Music Libraries, Archives and Documentation Centres (SQACBM), are now accepting panel, poster, and presentation proposals for our fall meeting at McGill University, Montreal, Quebec on November 8 and 9, 2018. We are pleased to announce that the MLA Board of Directors will also be joining us for this international conference. Please be advised that attendees from the U.S. will need a passport to attend.

Registration is $60 (US). On Thursday, the day will end with a reception at the Marvin Duchow Music Library. More details on the meeting including hotel information, etc. will be forthcoming.

Travel Grant

NEMLA is now accepting applications for grant support to attend the Fall chapter meeting in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The $400 of support may be awarded to a single individual or divided among as many as three awardees at the discretion of the NEMLA Board.
Preference will be given to current or recent MLS graduate students or new library professionals.

Applications are due Wednesday, August 15, 2018. To apply, please complete the form at https://goo.gl/forms/AzvMyMEY8HoVCL6i2.

Call for Proposals

We welcome submissions explaining and raising awareness of your recent projects, research, innovations, discoveries, etc., relating to music and to the profession of music librarianship — anything that you think would benefit Chapter members and their constituencies. Presentations should be 35 minutes in length (including questions period). Please indicate if additional time is requested, subject to approval. Proposals must include:

  • Name(s) and affiliation(s) of presenters/panelists
  • Presentation language (English or French)
  • Contact information (e-mail and telephone number)
  • Title of presentation/panel
  • An abstract of 100-200 words
  • Any additional equipment required beyond a computer, Internet access, projector, and speakers

Please send proposals via e-mail to any member of the program committee (see below), using the subject line: “Joint Conference Fall 2018 Proposal.”

The proposal deadline is Wednesday, August 1, 2018. Accepted presenters will be notified of their status by August 15, 2018.

Program Committee:

Sarah Funke Donovan, Boston Symphony Orchestra (sdonovan@bso.org)

Jim Farrington, Eastman School of Music (jfarrington@esm.rochester.edu)

Christiane Melançon, Université de Montréal (christiane.melancon@umontreal.ca)

Noteworthy News

NEMLA Archives

NEMLA Archives needs a permanent home! The NEMLA chapter’s archives comprises 18.5 linear feet of historical materials that include oral histories, newsletters, business records, photographs, and more. The bulk of the collection is currently stored (unofficially) at the Boston Public Library, plus a few linear feet in the national MLA archives at the University of Maryland (which we, along with most chapters, have been asked to withdraw and house locally). Therefore, we are in search of a new home for this collection in the New England region. Please contact NEMLA chapter archivist Sofía Becerra with any questions or leads: sbecerralicha@berklee.edu. Thank you!

NEMLA Officers

 

Chair:
Marci Cohen
Assistant Head
Music Library
Boston University
771 Commonwealth Ave.
Boston, MA 02215
mcohen2 at bu.edu
(617) 353-3707
Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect:
Sarah Funke Donovan
Associate Archivist for Digital Assets
Boston Symphony Orchestra
301 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
sdonovan at bso.org
(617) 638-9452
Past Chair:
Jared Rex
Music Librarian
Fenwick Music Library
College of the Holy Cross
1 College Street
Worcester, MA 01610
jrex at holycross.edu
(508) 793-2295
Secretary-Treasurer:Alan Karass
Alan Karass
Director of Libraries
New England Conservatory
290 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115-5018
alan.karass at necmusic.edu
(617) 585-1247
Member-At-Large:
Patricia (Tish) Brennan
Associate Professor/Head of Reference
James P. Adams Library
Rhode Island College
600 Mt Pleasant Ave
Providence, RI 02908
pbrennan at ric.edu
(401) 456-2810
Newsletter Editor:Memory Apata
Memory Apata
Music & Performing Arts Librarian
Dartmouth College
Paddock Music Library
Hopkins Center, HB 6245 Hanover, NH 03755
memory.r.apata at dartmouth.edu
(603) 646-3234
Sofia Becerra-LichaNEMLA Archivist:
Sofia Becerra-Licha
Archivist
Stan Getz Library
Berklee College of Music
1140 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02215
sbecerralicha at berklee.edu
Office: (617)747-8001
Website Editor:
Lisa Wollenberg
Public Services Librarian
Allen Library
University of Hartford
200 Bloomfield Ave
West Hartford, CT 06117
lwollenbe at hartford.edu
Office: (860) 768-4840

Publication Information:

New England Quarter Notes is published quarterly in September, December, March/April and June/July.
Back issues may be accessed from:
http://nemla.musiclibraryassoc.org/resources/newsletters/

Address all correspondence concerning editorial matters to:
Memory Apata
memory.r.apata@dartmouth.edu

Inquiries concerning subscription, membership and change of address should be directed to:
Alan Karass
alan.karass@necmusic.edu

Membership year runs September to August.
Regular Personal Membership:$12.00
Student and Retired Membership:$6.00
Institutional Membership$16.00

Return to the New England Music Library Association home page.

NEW ENGLAND QUARTER NOTES: FEBRUARY 2018, NO. 197

Message from the Chair
Spring 2018 Election Ballot
Spring 2018 Meeting Information
NEMLA Officers
Publication Information

Message from the Chair

Dear NEMLA members,

Happy new year!

It is a pleasure to greet you in my last newsletter column as Chair. My term of office seems to have just started; in fact, it’s hard to believe spring is almost upon us!

It was wonderful to see many you at MLA in Portland a few weeks ago. For those who missed our annual chapter dinner, we had twenty-five members in attendance for an evening of fun and fellowship at The Picnic House PDX, a restaurant which allowed us a glimpse inside Portland’s bustling food scene. Marci and I attended the Chapter Chairs’ meeting at MLA, where we discussed issues facing our chapter directly with the MLA board. We were pleased to hear that we are eligible to apply for chapter grants again this year to assist with NEMLA’s increasing palette of outreach initiatives. If you have an outreach idea you would like the board to consider funding with a chapter grant, please let me know.

I hope that many of you will be able to join us for NEMLA’s spring meeting, which is just around the corner on Friday, March 23 at New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. If you are new to our organization and have not attended a meeting before, please consider applying for a First-Time Attendees Program, which covers costs of lunch and travel expenses to attend the meeting. The program committee — chaired by Marci Cohen with members Carolyn Johnson, Jenée Force, & Sara White, and site host, Alan Karass, with his NEC staff – have created a rousing day of events. We will hear a reprise of Robert Cunningham and Andrea Cawelti’s presentation given in Portland on cataloging binders collections (which I was fortunate enough to attend, and I am delighted to hear a recap), about the trials and tribulations of migrating to a new ILS system, and a session focused on interviews compiled by Robert Dumm. After the presentations, we will tour NEC’s new Blumenthal Family Library and its Student Life and Performance Center, which will be followed by a special concert of compositions from two NEC doctoral candidates, Nima Janmohammadi and Cody Forrest. More details about registration can be found below. As always, our spring meeting will also include our annual business meeting. A call for agenda topics will be announced in the coming weeks. Please let me know if you would like something added to the meeting’s agenda.

Voting for open board positions will commence on February 25, 2018. Positions on this year’s slate include Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect and Member-At-Large. There are multiple candidates for each open position (biographies below). Members in good standing will receive an e-mail ballot to vote in the upcoming days. If your membership has lapsed, please renew your membership now in order to vote. I am especially grateful to our nominating committee (chair: Laura Stokes; members: Suzanne Eggleston Lovejoy; Maria Jane Loizou) for their hard work of putting together a qualified slate of candidates as well as the members who have volunteered their time and efforts to run for office! As you are aware, these efforts allow NEMLA to continue running smoothly, so I encourage you to vote for the newest additions to NEMLA’s ever-revolving board.

With that, I look forward to seeing many of you at our spring meeting! It has been a joy to serve NEMLA for the last two years as Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect and now Chair, and it has been exciting to be a part of promoting music librarianship both locally in New England and as a representative of our chapter nationally. Marci Cohen will become your next Chair at the spring meeting, and I look forward to her leadership over the following year.

Respectfully submitted,

Jared Rex, Chair, New England Music Library Association

Music Librarian, College of the Holy Cross

Spring 2018 Election Ballot

Spring 2018 Election Ballot

Elections for two positions on NEMLA’s board will begin on February 25, 2018. On that day, all NEMLA members in good standing will receive an email message inviting them to vote. Many thanks to our candidates for running, and to the Nominating Committee for their hard work in assembling this slate.

Candidates for Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect

Sarah Funke Donovan

Sarah Funke Donovan would be thrilled to serve NEMLA in the capacity of Vice-Chair/Chair Elect. She has been a NEMLA member since 2012, and has previously served a term as NEMLA Secretary-Treasurer from 2013-2015. During that time, she effected the organization’s inaugural use of EventBrite to manage meeting registrations and payments. Her experience also includes work for other professional associations: as a member of New England Archivists, she served on the program committee for NEA’s Spring 2016 meeting in Portland, Maine.

Sarah currently works as the Associate Archivist for Digital Asset Management at the Boston Symphony Orchestra. From 2012-2016, she managed grant-funded digital content projects for the BSO Archives, and in 2017, was promoted to her current position in order to implement and manage the organization’s first digital asset management system. When she’s not letting her 20-month-old experiment with alternative tuning techniques on her old banjo, she brings her family to outdoor concerts or holds ukelele sing-alongs.

Ruthann McTyre

Ruthann McTyre is the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Director of the Gilmore Music Library at Yale University.  She came to Yale in August 2013 from the University of Iowa, where she was head of the Rita Benton Music Library for 13 years.  Prior to that appointment, she worked at Baylor University, UNC Chapel Hill, and Southern Methodist University.  She holds an undergraduate degree in Music Education, a master’s degree in voice,both from SMU, and her Library Science degree is from the University of North Texas.  Ruthann has been an active member of the Music Library Association since 1988 and had the privilege of serving as President 2009-2011.  Chapter involvement in other parts of the country has most recently included Midwest Chapter Chair, program chair (As Chair-Elect), and hosting Midwest at UIowa.  Her favorite assignment at the national meetings was facilitating the Hot Topics sessions for several years.

Candidates for Member-at-Large

Elizabeth Berndt-Morris

Liz Berndt-Morris is the Music Reference and Research Librarian at the Eda Kuhn Loeb Music Library. In this role she serves as a liaison to the Music Department and coordinates research, teaching, and learning services and initiatives for the Music Library.

Prior to Harvard University, she was the Curator of Music at Boston Public Library in the Arts Department working mostly with special collections, and Music Reference and Collections Librarian at Central Michigan University where she earned a master’s degree in music education. She also holds a MLS degree with a specialization certificate in music librarianship from Indiana University and a Bachelor of Music in Music Education degree from the University of Kentucky.

Patricia B. M. “Tish” Brennan

Tish is currently Head of Reference and Research Support, Coordinator of Library Instruction (James P. Adams Library) and liaison to the Department of Music, Theatre, and Dance at Rhode Island College. She keeps out of trouble by singing with Rhode Island Civic Chorale and Orchestra and dancing with the Modern Jazz Dance Studio tap ensemble. Tish holds an AB in Music from Brown University and an MSLS from Columbia University. She has been a member of NEMLA from 1976–1997 and 2000–present, and has served as editor of the Directory of Music Libraries and Collections in New England and on the Instruction Committee.

Having had two hats to wear—music librarian and general reference/instruction—for a good part of her career, she is very interested in the Outreach responsibilities of the NEMLA Member-at-Large.  She holds memberships in NELA, RILA, ACRL/NEC, and other local library organizations and would welcome the opportunity to reach out and promote NEMLA to our New England library colleagues.  Collaborating with the Vice-Chair and the Programming Committee as part of the Education role of the Member-at-Large would be an exciting challenge to tackle as well.

Sara White

Sara White moved to New Haven, Connecticut from Lansing, Michigan, where she was the library assistant in the Fine Arts Library at Michigan State University. She studied music performance at Michigan State University before receiving her MLS from Wayne State University. After moving to New Haven, Sara became the Reference and Adult Services Librarian for the West Haven Public Library. She quickly became involved with the Connecticut Library Association and New England Music Library Association. She currently serves on the Programming Committee for NEMLA, the Development Committee for MLA, and is the Chair of the Reference and Adult Services section of the CLA. In her free time, Sara loves playing her bassoon in her community orchestra, teaching bassoon lessons, scrapbooking, and hiking with her husband and their pug.

Spring 2018 Meeting Information

Register here!

We are pleased to announce the registration information for our Spring 2018 meeting.  Early Bird registration will be $18 for regular members and $9 for student and retired members. Please register by Thursday, March 15 to receive the Early Bird rate. Registrations from March 16 through 23 (including walk-ins) will be $20 and $10, respectively. Early bird registration ends Thursday, March 15.

Our spring meeting will take place on Friday, March 23 at New England Conservatory in Boston, MA at Pierce Hall, 241 St. Botolph St. The day will feature sessions on the archival collection of interviews with piano luminaries conducted by Robert Dumm, how to work with binders’ volumes, and a panel discussion on ILS and discovery layer migration. The event will also include a business meeting, a tour of the newly opened Blumenthal Family Library and Student Life and Performance Center (SLPC), a concert and a closing reception.

Thursday Dinner

All attendees are invited to a pre-conference group dinner on Thursday night, March 22 at 7:00 p.m. at Five Horses Tavern, 535 Columbus Ave. The restaurant includes vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free menu options. If you would like to attend, please RSVP to Marci Cohen (mcohen2@bu.edu) by Thursday, March 15.

Meeting Program

9:00 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. Registration; coffee and pastries

9:45 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Opening Remarks – Jared Rex, NEMLA Chair; Tom Novak, NEC Interim President, Provost, and Dean

10:00 – 10:40 a.m. “Bound for Glory: Cataloging Bound Sheet Music as Collections” (Robert Cunningham, Boston Public Library; Andrea Cawelti, Harvard University)

10:40 – 11:20 a.m. “Pianists Speak: The Interviews of Robert Dumm, 1959-2008” (Jean Wald, Stetson University)

11:20 a.m. – 11:50 a.m. Business meeting

11:50 a.m. – 1:20 p.m. Lunch on your own

1:20 – 2:40 p.m. “Migrating to a New ILS and Discovery Layer: Perspectives from the Trenches” (Patricia (Tish) Brennan, Rhode Island College; Andrea Cawelti, Harvard University; Rebecca McCallum, Wesleyan University; Alec McLane, Wesleyan University; Michael Rogan, Tufts University)

2:40 – 3:25 p.m. Tours of the Blumenthal Family Library and the SLPC

3:30 – 4:15 p.m. Concert:

Setar Improvisation / Nima Janmohammadi, DMA Candidate

Ciaccona (2015) for violin alone / Cody Forrest, DMA Candidate
Chu Chun Jean Huang, violin

Invocation (2017) for String Quartet / Cody Forrest, DMA Candidate
Chu Chun Jean Huang and Shuxiang Yang, violins
Daniel Orsen, viola
Joseph Gotoff, cello

4:15 – 5:30 p.m. Reception

Hotel

NEC has a standing special rate at the Colonnade Hotel, 120 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02116. Enter the corporate/promotion code NEC when making reservations online or on the phone. Full details, including a link to the hotel website, are on the NEC website. NEC also has a list of additional hotels nearby or accessible via public transit.

Transportation

Attendees are encouraged to take public transportation. NEC has public transit and driving directions to campus. NEC is 0.8 mi. from Amtrak’s Back Bay Station. South Station, with Amtrak, MBTA, and intercity bus service is 2 miles away. Gainsborough Garage at 10 Gainsborough St. is the closest parking; additional parking information is available here.

NEC/Boston Information

Here is a campus map of NEC. The library website is here. The Greater Boston Convention & Visitors Bureau has more information about the city.

First-Time Attendees

If this is your first NEMLA meeting, we welcome you to apply for our First-Time Attendees Program. This grant covers registration, lunch, and travel expenses. Both current members and non-members are eligible, so long as they have not attended a meeting before. The deadline to apply for funding through this program is March 9, 2018. Please apply here. Also note that funding is regrettably not available for all first-time attendees, but we do strive to accommodate as many as we can on a first come, first served basis.

To encourage new involvement in NEMLA, if you bring a first-time attendee to the meeting, you will receive free registration. To take advantage of this offer, email Marci Cohen (mcohen2@bu.edu) by March 9 with the subject line “NEMLA first-time attendee referral.” Include your name and affiliation and the name of the first-time attendee you are hosting. The new attendee must also register for the First-Time Attendee Program, but this does not have to be done simultaneously.

Welcoming First-Time Attendees

Would you like to help a first-time attendee feel more welcome at their first meeting? We are looking for hosts to aid newcomers in getting to know our organization and its members. The time commitment is very low. You will be paired with a first-time attendee to either introduce them to people during the registration/coffee period in the morning or have them accompany you to lunch. (You are not responsible for paying for their lunch.) Our board members did this at our fall meeting, and it was so successful that we are happy to roll out the opportunity to all our returning attendees. Please email Marci Cohen (mcohen2@bu.edu) by Monday, March 19 to volunteer.

NEMLA Officers

Chair:
Jared Rex
Music Librarian
Fenwick Music Library
College of the Holy Cross
1 College Street
Worcester, MA 01610
jrex at holycross.edu
(508) 793-2295

Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect:
Marci Cohen
Assistant Head
Music Library
Boston University
771 Commonwealth Ave.
Boston, MA 02215
mcohen2 at bu.edu
(617) 353-3707

Past Chair:
Laura Stokes
Performing Arts Librarian
Orwig Music Library
Brown University
Providence, RI 02912
laura_stokes at brown.edu
(401) 863-3999

Secretary-Treasurer:
Alan Karass
Director of Libraries
New England Conservatory
290 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115-5018
alan.karass at necmusic.edu
(617) 585-1247

Member-At-Large:
Jonathan Manton
Music Librarian for Access Services
Irving S. Gilmore Music Library
Yale University
120 High Street
PO Box 208240
New Haven, CT 06520
jonathan.manton at yale.edu
(203) 432-5549

Newsletter Editor:
Memory Apata
Music & Performing Arts Librarian
Dartmouth College
Paddock Music Library
Hopkins Center, HB 6245 Hanover, NH 03755
memory.r.apata at dartmouth.edu
(603) 646-3120

NEMLA Archivist:
Sofia Becerra-Licha
Archivist
Stan Getz Library
Berklee College of Music
1140 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02215
sbecerralicha at berklee.edu
Office: (617)747-8001

Web Page Editor:
Sarah Hunter
Electronic Inventory Manager
Mugar Library
Boston University
771 Commonwealth Ave.
Boston, MA 02215
shunter at bu.edu
Office: (617) 353-5810

Publication Information:

New England Quarter Notes is published quarterly in September, December, March/April and June/July.
Back issues may be accessed from:
http://nemla.musiclibraryassoc.org/resources/newsletters/

Address all correspondence concerning editorial matters to:
Memory Apata
memory.r.apata at dartmouth.edu

Inquiries concerning subscription, membership and change of address should be directed to:
Alan Karass
alan.karass at necmusic.edu

Membership year runs September to August.
Regular Personal Membership:$12.00
Student and Retired Membership:$6.00
Institutional Membership$16.00

Return to the New England Music Library Association home page.

NEW ENGLAND QUARTER NOTES: DECEMBER 2017, NO. 196

Message from the Chair
Secretary/Treasurer’s Report
Fall 2017 Meeting Minutes
Spring 2018 Meeting Preview
Seeking Nominations/Committee Members
Noteworthy News
Special Report: Oral History Excerpt
NEMLA Officers
Publication Information

Message from the Chair

Greetings, NEMLA members!

Although the weather in New England has changed from luscious fall colors to stark white and chilly, I am still thinking about our spectacular fall meeting at Yale University back in October. It was wonderful to see so many new and old NEMLA members there, and it is a meeting that will be remembered for years to come. For those who were unable to attend–or for those wanting to refresh themselves on the day’s events–you can read a thorough summary of our meeting from our Member-At-Large, Jonathan Manton, in the pages below. After every meeting, it is important to acknowledge the efforts of those who assisted with facilitating local arrangements and programming for their willingness to take on extra responsibilities. I would like to thank the staff of Yale’s Gilmore Music Library–in particular, Jonathan Manton and Ruthann McTyre–for welcoming us to Yale’s campus and arranging our special tour of antiquarian and rare music materials, and also to Anne Rhodes and Kimmy Setzo for providing a memorable concert to conclude the meeting. Marci Cohen, our Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect, and our first-rate program committee developed an intriguing program of speakers and tours, and their contributions allowed the meeting to happen seamlessly. Special thanks to all of our presenters: Mark Bailey, Bridget Carr, Sarah Funke Donovan, and John Marks! For those who participated in committee meetings, I look forward to hearing about your discussions and developments over the next few months.

With committees in mind, there are still many open positions on almost every committee. These committees are the lifeblood of NEMLA. They allow our organization to engage with its membership in a way suited to your interests, and I encourage you to consider serving NEMLA in this way. Every committee member brings unique skills and experiences that benefit our collective knowledge base. It is also a good way to impact the national discourse of music librarianship at a local level. Please let me or any other board member know if you are interested in one of our open committee positions. As I mentioned in our fall newsletter, the board is also exploring the idea of developing communities of interest to either supplement or replace our current committee structure. While I have started this discussion with some of you, I hope to be able to discuss it at greater length with more of our membership in the coming months before our spring meeting.

In case you missed the announcement, I am delighted to mention  that our spring meeting will be held at the New England Conservatory on March 23, 2018! As many of you know, NEC opened a new music library last summer, and I am thankful that Alan Karass and his staff are willing to host us in the midst of acclimating to their new space. Please join us in what is shaping up to be a informative and engaged day. If you have been working on a special project or new initiative, consider drafting a proposal to present at our spring meeting. Submissions can be emailed to Marci Cohen until January 17th. More information about our spring meeting can be found below.

As in past years, we will have a chapter dinner at the MLA national meeting. This year we will be in Portland, OR, and the dinner is on Thursday night, February 1 at 7:00 p.m. Be sure to mark your calendars and consider joining us! NEMLA’s annual dinner is always a highlight of our national meeting since it allows us the chance to get to know one another better in a lighthearted atmosphere surrounded by wonderful food and colleagues. Currently, I am in the process of finalizing a restaurant which suits multiple dietary needs. Further details will be announced in early January.

Lastly, with every new year comes the opportunity to consider nominating yourself or one of your colleagues to run for office on our board. Two positions will be open at our spring meeting: Vice-Chair/Chair/Past-Chair and Member-At-Large. While Laura Stokes and Jon Manton will be missed when they rotate off of the board, this is a wonderful opportunity to serve the constituents of our organization and make a difference. If you are new to NEMLA–or if you have served on committees in the past but not on the board–I strongly encourage you to consider running for office. It has been an extremely rewarding opportunity for me. The deadline for nominations is February 7, 2018; please contact Laura Stokes with nominations.

Best wishes for wonderful and restful holidays, and a happy new year! See you in Portland!

Respectfully submitted,

Jared Rex, Chair, New England Music Library Association

Secretary/Treasurer’s Report

Membership

Thanks to all who have renewed their memberships or have recently joined NEMLA.  We currently have 71 active members (we had 50 in December 2016)!  If you have any questions about the status of your membership, please e-mail Alan Karass at nemlaboard@gmail.com.

Meeting attendance

We had 51 people attend the meeting, two of whom were supported by our first-time attendee program.

Finances

Fall meeting income: $ 880.28

Fall meeting expenses: $ 599.82

First-time attendee expenses: $ 80.00

Checking account: $ 4,879.38

Savings account: $ 4,005.53

Grant funds (Oral history): $ 480.50

Submitted by

Alan Karass
NEMLA Secretary-Treasurer

Fall 2017 Meeting Minutes

The Fall Meeting of the New England Chapter of the Music Library Association (NEMLA) was held at Yale University Library on October 20, 2017. This was an especially memorable meeting for me, as myself and my colleagues at Yale had the great pleasure of hosting the meeting and welcoming our fantastic colleagues from across the region to the first meeting at Yale since 2010.

The day included a tour of the newly renovated Gilmore Music Library at Yale. Photo by Marci Cohen.

NEMLA Chair Jared Rex kicked off proceedings by welcoming fifty-one attendees, including three first-time attendees. He also announced the winner of NEMLA’s 2018 MLA Travel Grant award – a $500 award to assist with travel to the MLA 2018 Annual Meeting in Portland, OR. This went to Leonard Martin from New England Conservatory. Congratulations Leonard! See you in Portland! Jared then introduced Susan Gibbons, University Librarian for Yale University Library, and Ruthann McTyre, Director of the Gilmore Music Library at Yale, who offered a warm welcome to Yale.

Marci Cohen, NEMLA Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect, then introduced our speakers for the day. First up was Mark Bailey, Head of Historical Sound Recordings (HSR) at the Gilmore Music Library, who presented  “Historical Sound Recordings as Musical Mentors.” In this presentation, Bailey discussed the unique role archival sound recordings play in the study of performance practice, especially during the early part of the 20th century. Bailey noted that the use of sound recordings within performance practice research continues to grow. HSR has never been busier! One notable takeaway for me from Bailey’s presentation was his highlighting of a 1903 recording of Verdi’s Otello, with Francesco Tamagno in the lead role. Tamagno was selected by Verdi to be the very first Otello for the première of the work at Teatro alla Scala on February 5, 1887. Tamagno’s recording of the work in 1903 is perhaps the nearest thing we have to a source that indicates Verdi’s preferred voice and stylistic approach for the role of Otello.

Next up were Bridget Carr and Sarah Funke Donovan from Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO) Archives. Their presentation, “Navigating the Rapids of Streaming Audio: Rights and Permissions for Presenting Audio Materials Online,” outlined a myriad of rights-related issues they had to address as part of a large scale AV digitization and access project at the BSO Archives. In order to make the digitized items available online, Carr and Funke Donovan had to negotiate performer rights for numerous different categories of performer, including students, faculty, guest artists and some union member performances. This included reviewing signed releases for student performances, notifying faculty and guest artists of the plans to stream recordings, giving them the right to opt-out if preferred, and restricting union member performances to onsite access only. They also had to work with a number of publishers to negotiate rights for those works that were still under copyright. However, they ultimately discovered that their existing Performing Rights Organization (PRO) licenses covered about 70% of the in-copyright works they planned on making available.

Our final presentation of the day was from John Marks, entitled “Designing and Equipping Workspaces for Digital Archiving of Legacy Audio Media.” As Marks noted at the start of his presentation, he intended to talk about the “wires and pliers” of sound recording digitization equipment setups, with the intention of providing attendees with some useful tips for building basic setups in-house, at a reasonable cost. Marks provided us with a guided tour of a variety of products and workflows for any libraries considering digitizing sound recordings in-house.

With presentations, lunch, and committee meetings complete, we began a pretty busy but enjoyable afternoon which included a stop at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library to view a selection of the amazing archival musical gems held at Yale, and a tour of the newly renovated Gilmore Music Library. We were then treated to a fantastic half hour of song, provided by Anne Rhodes and Kimmy Szeto, who presented a selection of songs from the Gilmore Music Library’s Special Collections, including works by Virgil Thomson, Kurt Weill and Cole Porter. To end the day, we then went “To the tables down at Mory’s”, to quote the famous Yale Whiffenpoof’s song about the Yale Club, for our final reception.

Anne Rhodes and Kimmy Szeto. Photo by Jonathan Manton.

On a personal note, I would like to thank everyone who made the trip to New Haven for the meeting. I know I speak for the rest of my colleagues at Yale when I say how happy we were to see the library filled with so many of our Music Library colleagues. This is also my last meeting review as NEMLA Member-at-Large. It has been a pleasure to serve NEMLA in this role for the past two years.

Submitted by Jonathan Manton, NEMLA Member-at-Large.

Spring 2018 Meeting Preview

Spring 2018 Meeting Preview

NEMLA’s spring meeting will be held on Friday, March 23 at New England Conservatory (NEC) in Boston. Our NEC hosts are proud to show off the brand new Blumenthal Family Library, which just opened this fall.

The New England Conservatory of Music, founded in 1867, is the oldest independent school of music in the United States, and it is widely recognized as one of the country’s most distinguished music schools. The newly opened Blumenthal Family Library contains a diverse assortment of musical materials—125,000 books and 80,000 recordings—that supports the school’s curriculum and preserves the rich musical legacy of NEC and musical life of Boston.

Please watch the NEMLA listserv for registration and other details in the upcoming months. Please e-mail Marci Cohen (mcohen2@bu.edu) if you have questions.

The program committee also encourages all NEMLA members and other colleagues to consider submitting proposals to present at the spring meeting. We want to hear about new initiatives and projects at your home institutions. We welcome submissions explaining and raising awareness of your recent projects, research, innovations, discoveries, etc., relating to music and to the profession of music librarianship — anything that you think would benefit chapter members and their constituencies.

Presentations should be 35–40 minutes in length. Please indicate if additional time is requested, subject to approval. Proposals must include:
Name(s) and affiliation(s) of presenters/panelists
Contact information (email and telephone number)
Title of presentation/panel
An abstract of 100-300 words
Any additional equipment required beyond a computer, internet access, projector, and speakers

Please send proposals via email to the program committee by emailing Marci Cohen (mcohen2@bu.edu). In your submission e-mail, please use the subject line: “NEMLA Spring ‘18 Proposal.”

The proposal deadline is Wednesday, January 17. Accepted presenters will be notified of their status by February 9, 2018.

Special thanks to the program committee and Alan Karass for hosting us.

Marci Cohen, Vice-Chair/Chair Elect
Assistant Head, Music Library, Mugar Memorial Library
Boston University
mcohen2@bu.edu
617-353-3707

Seeking Nominations/Committee Members

Call for Nominations:

NEMLA seeks candidates for two positions on the NEMLA Board. Serving as a Board member is a great opportunity to contribute substantially to your MLA chapter as well as to music librarianship overall. Candidates for these positions will appear on the ballot for the Spring 2018 election:
Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect (3-year term):

  • Chairs the Program Committee
  • Serves as an ex-officio member of the Education & Outreach Committee.
  • Performs the duties of the Chair in the latter’s absence.
  • The term of office shall be one year, after which the Vice-Chair shall succeed to the office of Chair and then Past-Chair, requiring a commitment of three years.

Member-at-Large (2-year term):

  • Acts as liaison to relevant professional organizations in New England (such as the New England Library Association (NELA),the six state library associations, the New England chapter of ACRL (ACRL/NEC), and the New England chapter of the American Musicological Society (AMS), primarily to promote information
    exchange and outreach.
  • Serves as Chair of the Education & Outreach Committee.
  • The term of office shall be two years.

Terms of office begin immediately after the spring meeting. Officers must be in good standing and current with their dues. The Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect must also be a member of the national Music Library Association.
Please email Laura Stokes (laura_stokes at brown.edu) if you would like to nominate yourself or someone else for one of these positions, or if you have any questions.  The nomination deadline is Wednesday, February 7, 2018.

Noteworthy News

Thank you, Ned Quist, music librarian, par excellence.  We wish you a joyous retirement. Thanks for the memories!

ned quist

Edwin “Ned” Quist is a long-time music librarian and member of both NEMLA and MLA. Ned’s career as a music librarian began at the Peabody Institute of Music, where he was the Head of the Arthur Friedheim Library from 1976 to 2001. In 2001, he became the Music Librarian and head of the Orwig Music Library at Brown University, taking over the position previously held by Carol Tatian. Ned worked tirelessly to augment Brown’s holdings, especially in popular music sound recordings, and developed Brown’s audio digitization capacities. Ned served as Vice-Chair of NEMLA in 2005–2006, Chair in 2006–2007, and Past-Chair in 2007–2008. In 2011, Ned was made the Associate University Librarian for Research and Outreach Services at Brown; in this role he has directed outreach from the libraries to academic departments and centers and managed the core group of subject specialists in the library. He remained active and interested in NEMLA and MLA even after his move into library administration. Ned, his wife Alice Pace, and their friend Andrew Grover are the members of White Squall, a band specializing in traditional and folk music which was featured at NEMLA’s Spring 2014 chapter meeting.  Ned is also a dedicated and talented woodworker. Ned will retire from Brown on January 3, 2018.

Laura K. T. Stokes, Performing Arts Librarian, Brown University

Special Report: Oral History Excerpt

On August 18, 2017, Debra Mandel, Head, Recording Studios, Northeastern University Libraries, went to Brown University and interviewed Ned for the MLA Oral History Project.  Here is an abridged version of that interview.

DM: Good to see you. So we’re going to be generally talking about your career as a music librarian, and your involvement in MLA and NEMLA. So, let’s start out with your background prior to becoming a music librarian, maybe your background in music and how you chose to come to librarianship?

NQ: Well, to some degree it was accidental. At the time I first became a music librarian, I was a grad student at the Peabody Conservatory in Music History. At that time, I was close to finishing my degree–my masters degree–and Geraldine Ostrove–who was then the music librarian at the Peabody Conservatory–had just resigned to take a job at New England Conservatory. The scuttlebutt was that they hadn’t started a search yet, but things were very informal in those days, and my boss at the time–I was working as a secretary in the music education department just to make a few bucks while I was finishing my masters thesis–said, “Why don’t you talk to the director and say you’d be interested in working in the library, if you are,” and I said, “Sure!” So, I sent an email–no, I didn’t send an email, I sent a memo– there was no email in those days–to the director and got an invitation to join him for lunch, which I did. And he was sitting there with the Dean, and these were in the days when the lunches were considerably more alcoholic than they are these days. So the director at that time was Richard Franko Goldman–son of Edwin Franko Goldman of the famous Goldman Band–and Richard sat me down. We had a nice chat for awhile, then he said, “So, you want to be a music librarian?” I said, “I’d like to do that, it sounds like fun.” He says, “You know how to order books?” I said, “I’m sure I can figure it out.” He said, “Good. When can you start?” And he offered me the lordly sum of $6,000 a year, which to me was a lot of money. This was 1976, just before Peabody joined the Johns Hopkins family. So, by the time I became librarian in July, we were part of the Johns Hopkins community as a school, and that’s how I got started. So it was totally by accident and it was totally, probably illegal; these days, it would be considered very bad HR practice. But I was delighted to get in through the back door, and shortly thereafter I became a student at Catholic University, where I got my library degree while working in the library.

DM: What do you remember most about that library?

NQ: It was very small; we were in what had previously been a dance studio, a hallway, and, I think, the changing rooms for the dance studio. It was that way until–gosh–almost 1990? I’m trying to remember what year–probably 1990. We got a new library at that point and I was involved in the design. I wasn’t involved in the construction but I certainly monitored it every day. I had my own hardhat and I’d go over and wander around, and the foreman would see me and grab me and show me what was going on, so it was kind of fun. But the early years in the music library were difficult. Everything was totally manual in those days.  We bought a PC, I remember, one year, that was about 1980. It was one of the first IBM PC’s, cost $4,000, had no hard drive, and took about ten minutes to boot up.

DM: Unbelievable.

NQ: So, yeah, that’s how I got started.

DM: So were you involved in any organizations then, did you get involved?

NQ: I joined the local chapter–the Chesapeake chapter, then–of MLA, and was very involved in that and went to my first MLA meeting in Boston, actually.

DM: Was that your first time in Boston?

NQ: Yeah, I think so, ‘78 maybe? And that’s where I met all sorts of people that would later become my colleagues in NEMLA.

DM: Very interesting. So, what brought you to Providence, Rhode Island? When did you make that move?

NQ: I made that move in 2001. I had been at the MLA meeting in New York that year, and saw the advertisement on the table. At that time my first wife and I had divorced and my children had moved out with her to California, so I had nothing keeping me in Baltimore. I applied for this job, and much to my surprise, I got it. So–it was exciting, especially since I’d only worked in one place for almost twenty-seven years.

DM: And did you have a very strong network in MLA?

NQ: I was involved in MLA, I’d been Convention Manager for MLA, I’d been on the board before I came here, during that famous period when we went through the shift of management firms.

DM: So then when did you get involved with NEMLA?

NQ: Well, as soon as I got to Providence I got involved with NEMLA. I can’t remember what meeting I went to first, but of course, one of my references for this job was Paula Matthews–who, I think, by that time had probably moved to the Boston Athenaeum.

DM: Right.

NQ: And so, I think she was instrumental. Also, my predecessor at Brown, Carol Tatian, made sure that I knew about NEMLA and was going to attend the meetings. Actually I was much more diligent about attending NEMLA meetings than I had been previously in Baltimore attending the Chesapeake chapter.

DM: So, what do you think you liked about NEMLA?

NQ: Well, NEMLA was a very sophisticated and large organization compared to the Mid-Atlantic Chesapeake chapter, which was very small. I mean, we were lucky if we got ten or fifteen people in a meeting. And the first NEMLA meeting I went to was forty or fifty people. And I’ve seen bigger ones. So, I remember one year, I think, in NEMLA, we had a joint meeting with Greater New York in New London. We had close to a hundred people at that meeting. First of all, Greater New York: no one went to those meetings, I’m told, so this was a big opportunity for them to get out of town (laughs).

DM: Very impressive, very impressive. So, how have you been involved in, or how had you been involved in NEMLA, either in committee work or serving as an officer?

NQ: I really never belonged to any committees but I somehow ended up as chair of NEMLA, just in time for the national MLA meeting to come to Newport. I think I had just finished being chair by the time it actually got here. I was involved in the invite. I remember doing a little hotel and city looking. Ken Crilly from Yale, myself, Ginny [Virginia] Daniels from Harvard, and I’m trying to remember who else was involved in this process. But there were several of us who visited various places around New England. I think Ken went to Manchester, New Hampshire–and of course he handled New Haven–and I looked at Portland, Maine, and Newport, and Ginny did a couple of other places too. And so we all came together and decided to make this offer to the MLA chapter.  I’ll never forget when we made the first offer, Ginny was convinced that you had to take a boat to get to Newport (laughing). We had to explain, “No, actually there’s bridges on both sides. The boat hasn’t been true since the early 1950’s, I think, so…” Anyway, that’s–and what else did I do in NEMLA? That’s about it. So local arrangements, chair, and president chair or whatever it’s called.

DM: So do you remember anything about that conference, the MLA conference and how it went?

NQ: Oh gosh, do I ever. Um, some good stories about that conference. Well, we had our chapter meeting, our NEMLA chapter meeting at Newport, I think, the fall before. So that would mean, the Newport meeting was 2004? 2005? [Ed. note: The Newport MLA meeting was in 2008.] And, so the fall before, we had our chapter meeting down there, and that was a lot of fun. Of course the exciting thing about that meeting was finding out–well after we’d signed the contract–that the hotel was undergoing–it had changed hands–and it was undergoing major renovation. And I guess we could have gotten out of the contract at that point, but we decided, no, we’d stick with it. I say we, it was mainly the convention manager, who was Gordon Rowley, I think, at that point. And the board, the MLA board, decided, “No, we’ll stick with it and see how it goes.” So, it was exciting because the hotel was half torn up. There was only a handful of us actually staying in the hotel. Their meeting rooms were all completely renovated and brand new, you could still smell the carpet. Everybody else had to be bussed to the hotel from various hotels around town: the Marriott,–which was really in walking distance–the Viking,–which was way across the bridge and up the hill a bit–and there may have been people at yet another place. But the hotel paid for that transportation, so basically we had a shuttle service running for us throughout Newport, which was fabulous.

DM: That’s fabulous.

NQ: But I can remember walking through some of the areas that were under renovation, and there were these great sheets of plastic hanging from the ceiling, dripping wet, because remember, this was February. And of course, by the end of the week we had snow. I’m trying to remember what else happened that meeting, though, that was real interesting. I remember one of the funny things about it is, we were told by the hotel–maybe the general manager who knew something about the history–that was on Goat Island, which during World War II had been a part of the submarine base. And before that, though, it turns out it was the site of one of the largest public hangings of pirates in the United States–or the colonies–and they were buried on Goat Island.

DM: Oh, boy.

NQ: So, that was kind of an interesting story to tell people. I also remember dragging equipment through the hotel–because we brought a local Cajun band in to play for the banquet–and having to help them drag all their equipment from some back door off an alley way. And the other thing I remember about that meeting–which many people will–is that was Suki Sommer’s last meeting. She was there in a wheelchair, sort of holding court, and people were coming to visit her in her room when they could, when she wasn’t sleeping. And it was, it was kind of a bittersweet farewell to her.

DM: So, at this stage in the interview, I’m going to ask you to reflect on anything you would like about your profession, about your association with NEMLA or MLA, or how you feel that your current position has been shaped by your years being a music librarian, and having organizational responsibilities.

NQ: Well, you’ve probably seen the article I wrote for Careers a couple years ago about music librarians leaving the nest, and it’s something that I actually learned when I was here. I remember going to a meeting of the Library Advisory Council at Brown, which is made up of alums and members of the Brown Corporation, the board. And they had this meeting in the library, and I had invited Katherine Bergeron–she was the chair of the music department at that time, so I invited her to this meeting at my boss’s request, and we were sitting there, and I think the woman in the room was the former–current director, at that time, of the University of Virginia libraries. She was director of the Virginia libraries, and she said something that stuck with me ever since: she said that more than any other part of librarianship, music librarians seem to be the most upwardly mobile. So, that was always sitting in the back of my head, and I think I actually used it in that article that I wrote–which I cheated on. I basically got a bunch of people to tell me how they became administrators. I contacted Michael Keller–who I used to room with in MLA way back in the dark ages, and we’d been in the RLG Music Program Committee together–and of course, my own boss, Harriette Hemmasi who was a former music librarian. And I think I also dragged in my good friend at Notre Dame, who I knew in the Mid-Atlantic states, Katherine Parr Walker…Katherine Parr Walker. Anyway, Diane and Michael and Harriette and maybe one other person told me what they thought about it, and it was interesting because it’s a very different approach. We all kind of agreed, I think, that music librarians get to do a greater variety of things. They get to know things at the ground level; and because rarely do they have big staff. I’m not sure, Indiana or, um–I’m trying to think of places that have great, big staff–Indiana, Illinois, maybe. You get to do all of these things, from fixing the photocopier machine to cataloguing, to reference work, to collection development, to electronic resources–all of that stuff is done by music librarians. So, of course, they’re the ones who are best qualified sometimes to step into these positions. I’m not sure I was, but I still got the opportunity to do it, and I’m about ready to finish doing it so, that’s kind of where I am right now, about that.

DM: So you’ve had a wonderful career–

NQ: Yeah!

DM: And you’ve been a wonderful part of the NEMLA and MLA organizations. So, thank you very much. If there’s anything else you’d like to say at this time?

NQ: Well, thank you, I’m honored that I got asked.

NEMLA Officers

Chair:
Jared Rex
Music Librarian
Fenwick Music Library
College of the Holy Cross
1 College Street
Worcester, MA 01610
jrex at holycross.edu
(508) 793-2295

Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect:
Marci Cohen
Assistant Head
Music Library
Boston University
771 Commonwealth Ave.
Boston, MA 02215
mcohen2 at bu.edu
(617) 353-3707

Past Chair:
Laura Stokes
Performing Arts Librarian
Orwig Music Library
Brown University
Providence, RI 02912
laura_stokes at brown.edu
(401) 863-3999

Secretary-Treasurer:
Alan Karass
Director of Libraries
New England Conservatory
290 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115-5018
alan.karass at necmusic.edu
(617) 585-1247

Member-At-Large:
Jonathan Manton
Music Librarian for Access Services
Irving S. Gilmore Music Library
Yale University
120 High Street
PO Box 208240
New Haven, CT 06520
jonathan.manton at yale.edu
(203) 432-5549

Newsletter Editor:
Memory Apata
Music & Performing Arts Librarian
Dartmouth College
Paddock Music Library
Hopkins Center, HB 6245 Hanover, NH 03755
memory.r.apata at dartmouth.edu
(603) 646-3120

NEMLA Archivist:
Sofia Becerra-Licha
Archivist
Stan Getz Library
Berklee College of Music
1140 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02215
sbecerralicha at berklee.edu
Office: (617)747-8001

Web Page Editor:
Sarah Hunter
Electronic Inventory Manager
Mugar Library
Boston University
771 Commonwealth Ave.
Boston, MA 02215
shunter at bu.edu
Office: (617) 353-5810

Publication Information:

New England Quarter Notes is published quarterly in September, December, March/April and June/July.
Back issues may be accessed from:
http://nemla.musiclibraryassoc.org/resources/newsletters/

Address all correspondence concerning editorial matters to:
Memory Apata
memory.r.apata at dartmouth.edu

Inquiries concerning subscription, membership and change of address should be directed to:
Alan Karass
alan.karass at necmusic.edu

Membership year runs September to August.
Regular Personal Membership:$12.00
Student and Retired Membership:$6.00
Institutional Membership$16.00

Return to the New England Music Library Association home page.

NEW ENGLAND QUARTER NOTES: SEPTEMBER 2017, NO. 195

Message from the Chair
Secretary /Treasurer’s Report
Fall 2017 Meeting Registration/Information
Committee Updates

Oral History Excerpt
NEMLA Officers
Publication Information

Message from the Chair

Dear NEMLA members,

It’s hard to believe that September has arrived once again! Whether you took a long vacation, short day-trips, or had a “staycation” at home, I hope you have enjoyed a relaxing and restful summer.

The NEMLA Board met for its annual meeting in early August. Many topics were discussed; however, one recurring theme we addressed was how to approach our outreach efforts to first-time attendees in new ways including, more specifically, how to retain and encourage new members to join and become active in our organization. Although numerous ideas are still being discussed, the board voted unanimously to offer free meeting registration to NEMLA members who bring a first-time attendee to a NEMLA meeting this year! I encourage everyone to reach out to paraprofessionals, library staff, or other individuals interested in our profession and bring them with you to our meetings. The board is enthusiastic to implement this outreach effort as early as our fall meeting, and we are excited about new possibilities for outreach in this area.

In case you missed the listserv announcement, NEMLA received a grant of $500 from the Music Library Association to help offset expenses associated with a library school student, recent graduate, or new professional attending the 2018 MLA national annual meeting in Portland, Oregon! Modeled from a similar grant offered by the Atlantic chapter last year, I am elated that NEMLA is able to provide this unique opportunity in New England. Interested applicants can apply here; applications are due September 30, 2017. I encourage everyone to share this information with interested parties who may not currently be NEMLA members, especially library school students and paraprofessionals who are interested or work in music librarianship. Special thanks to Laura Stokes, Jonathan Manton, and Sofia Becerra-Licha for drafting, editing, and submitting the grant application to MLA.

The arrival of September (and return of the fall semester) signals that arrangements for our fall meeting are underway. Marci Cohen and the Program Committee are tirelessly working on planning and arranging the logistics of the day. It will be held on Friday, October 20 at Yale University in New Haven, CT. The program looks spectacular and promises to be engaging with presentations on historical sound recordings, audio streaming rights, and digital archiving of legacy audio media. The music antiquarian in me is particularly excited to view treasures from Yale’s Beinecke Library. Other events include a tour of Yale’s Gilmore Music Library and a concert of songs from Yale’s extensive libraries featuring Anne Rhodes and Kimmy Szeto. We will conclude with a reception at Mory’s, a tavern near Yale, which was a favorite spot of composer Cole Porter among other prestigious Yale alumni! Additional details can be found in the fall meeting information section below. Lastly, consider attending the pre-conference dinner on Thursday night, October 19, by sending a RSVP to Marci Cohen if you will be arriving to New Haven early.

Looking ahead to our committee meetings held at our fall meeting, we have many open positions on almost every committee: the Program Committee, Instruction Committee, Technical Services Committee, and the Nominating Committee. Special thanks for Maria Jane Loizou for joining the Nominating Committee! If you have not recently served on a committee–or if you have served on one of our committees in the past–I encourage you to consider serving our organization on a new committee. Please contact one of our board members if you are interested. Another topic discussed at the board meeting was the possibility of establishing communities of interest to either supplement or replace our current committee structure. More information on these will be released and discussed over the upcoming year.

As mentioned above, if you are considering attending our fall meeting for the first time, please consider applying for our First-Time Attendees Program which provides funding for appropriate travel expenses.

With that, I hope your semester, if applicable, is off to a smooth start, and I look forward to seeing everyone in New Haven!

Respectfully submitted,

Jared Rex, Chair

New England Music Library Association

Secretary/Treasurer’s Report

New Members and Membership Renewals

NEMLA Memberships are now up for renewal (our membership year begins September 1).

Everything you need to renew your membership (including a 3-year renewal option) is on our Membership page: http://nemla.musiclibraryassoc.org/get-involved/membership/

Use the online form (scroll down the membership page) to update your information and indicate your method of payment.  Use the PayPal button (scroll down the membership page) to pay by credit card or PayPal.  To pay by check, make check payable to NEMLA and mail to:

Alan Karass

New England Conservatory

290 Huntington Ave.

Boston, MA 02115

Fall 2017 Meeting Registration/Information

We are pleased to announce the registration information for our Fall 2017 meeting.  Register here!

Irving S. Gilmore Music Library, Yale University, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=840357

Our fall meeting will take place on Friday, October 20 at Yale University in New Haven, CT.  All sessions will take place in the International Room in Sterling Memorial Library, 120 High St., unless otherwise noted. The day will feature sessions on Historical Sound Recordings as Musical Mentors, the Boston Symphony Orchestra Archives’ work in dealing with rights for audio streaming and Designing and Equipping Workspaces for the Digital Archiving of Legacy Audio Media. In the afternoon, we will see music collection gems at Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, get a tour of the recently renovated Irving S. Gilmore Music Library, hear a concert of songs from Yale’s special collections and conclude with a reception at at Mory’s, the famous Yale Tavern.

We are happy to introduce a new initiative to encourage new attendees. If you bring a first-time attendee to the meeting, your registration will be free. See First-Time Attendees below for more details.

Meeting Program

9:00 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.: Registration; coffee and pastries (underwriting by Arkivmusic) [Hallway leading to International Room]

9:45 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.: Opening Remarks – Jared Rex, NEMLA Chair; Ruthann McTyre, Director of Gilmore Music Library, Yale University Library; Susan Gibbons, University Librarian, Yale University Library.

10:00 – 10:40 “Historical Sound Recordings as Musical Mentors” (Mark Bailey, Yale University)

10:40 – 11:20 a.m. “Navigating the Rapids of Streaming Audio: Rights and Permissions for Presenting Audio Materials Online” (Bridget Carr and Sarah Funke Donovan, Boston Symphony Orchestra)

11:20 a.m.-12:00 p.m. “Designing and Equipping Workspaces for the Digital Archiving of Legacy Audio Media” (John Marks, Esperanto Audio/The Tannhäuser Gate)

12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m: Lunch on your own

1:30 – 2:00 pm – Committee Meetings

2:15 pm – Music Collection gems @ Beinecke (Beinecke Library)

3:00 pm – Tour of Gilmore Music Library (Gilmore Music Library)

3:45 pm – Concert: Anne Rhodes and Kimmy Szeto performing songs from Yale’s special collections (Sudler Hall)

4:30 pm – Reception (Mory’s, 306 York St. – cash bar)

By Unknown – Yale University Manuscripts & Archives Digital Images Database [1], Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10540108
Early Bird registration will be $18 for regular members and $9 for student and retired members. Please register by Thursday, October 12, 2017 to receive the Early Bird rate. Registrations from October 13 through 20 (including walk-ins) will be $20 and $10, respectively.

Thursday Dinner

All attendees are invited to a pre-conference group dinner on Thursday night, October 19 at 7:00 p.m. at Lalibela Ethiopian Restaurant, 176 Temple St. The restaurant includes vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free menu options. If you would like to attend, please RSVP to Marci Cohen (mcohen2 at bu.edu) by Thursday, October 12.

Hotel

We have reserved a block of rooms at La Quinta Inns & Suites in New Haven. The rate is $85.50-$107.10 depending on the night and the number of beds in the room. The hotel has free parking and is near I-91 and I-95. It is a short cab ride from the Yale campus, the dinner on Thursday, October. 19 and New Haven’s Union Station, with Amtrak service as well as regional bus and rail, including MTA service from New York’s Grand Central Terminal. The hotel also offers a local shuttle within a 5-mile radius of hotel, including Yale.

To reserve a room, please contact the hotel directly at (203) 562-1111 or their Group Desk at 1-800-642-4239, Option 1 and ask for the special rate for NEMLA.  Reservations must be made no later than 9/27/2017 in order to guarantee this special rate.

The Yale Visitor Center has a full list of lodging in the area with additional options.

Transportation

The Yale Visitor Center has driving directions to campus. The Yale Transportation Options site has information on parking and public transit options, including Amtrak and regional rail and bus service. In addition, Union Station is served by Peter Pan bus.

The Broadway parking lot at Broadway and Elm St. is the closest Yale-operated lot to Sterling Memorial Library. Other options are available. On-street parking is metered.

Yale Information

Here is a campus map of Yale and the website for Sterling Memorial Library. The Visitor Center website has more information about the campus and New Haven.

First-Time Attendees

If this is your first NEMLA meeting, we welcome you to apply for our First-Time Attendees Program. This grant covers registration, lunch, and travel expenses. Both current members and non-members are eligible, so long as they have not attended a meeting before. The deadline to apply for funding through this program is Oct. 6, 2017. Please apply here.  Also note that funding is regrettably not available for all first-time attendees, but we do strive to accommodate as many as we can on a first come, first served basis.

To encourage new involvement in NEMLA, if you bring a first-time attendee to the meeting, you will receive free registration. To take advantage of this offer, email Marci Cohen (mcohen2 at bu.edu) by Oct. 6 with the subject line “NEMLA first-time attendee referral.” Include your name and affiliation and the name of the first-time attendee you are hosting. The new attendee must also register for the First-Time Attendee Program, but this does not have to be done simultaneously.

Update on Committees

Laura Stokes, Past-Chair

There are lots of transitions to report for NEMLA’s committees!  We’d like to thank Anne Adams for volunteering to become the new chair of the Technical Services committee.  We also welcome Carolyn Johnson and Jenée Force to the Program Committee and Leslie Piper to the Publications Committee, and are delighted by Maria Jane Loizou’s return to the Nominating Committee. We appreciate the time and energy all of you devote to our organization!
Several committees are still looking for new members.  This is a great way to work on developments in music librarianship, meet people in this field, and be active on the regional level.  Specific groups seeking new members include the Program, Instruction, and Publication Committees.  We are also looking for people who would like to help with our web management.  If you are interested, please get in touch with the committee chairs or any member of the board.

http://nemla.musiclibraryassoc.org/organization/committees/

Update from the Oral History Committee

Reminiscing with Jennifer Hunt, Past NEMLA Chair

By Debra H. Mandel

Director, Snell Library Recording Studios, Northeastern University

The following conversation was selected from an abridged transcript from the March 17th NEMLA oral history committee interview conducted by me with Jennifer Hunt. Jennifer is Director of the Boston Conservatory Albert Alphin Library at Berklee.  She served as NEMLA chair in 2013, program chair in 2014 and past chair until 2016.

DM: So how did you become involved in NEMLA?

Jen Hunt photo
Jennifer Hunt

JH: Well, I started working at the Boston Conservatory in October of 2002 and I can’t remember exactly who told me about NEMLA, but I very soon thereafter found out about it and knew it would be a good idea to become a member. So I joined, and I didn’t do too much with NEMLA for a number of years, but, around 2011, Suzanne Lovejoy, who was the program chair, was looking for a meeting venue, and she called me up and said, “Would you like to a host a NEMLA meeting?” And I thought about it and said, “Well, yes I would, but you know, the Conservatory is pretty short on space, and I had concerns about that, and so I thought well, if there was another place near us where we could sort of have part of the meeting at the Conservatory and another part of the meeting there. So you see back then we were already collaborating, long before the merger. So that’s when we went ahead– we had part of the meeting at the Conservatory and we wrapped up in the afternoon over at Berklee.

DM: So how has NEMLA changed over the years?

JH: Well, people have come and gone. But with most things, I would say technology has really helped us along, you know. If you look at our website right now, you can go on there and find videos of our past meetings and see pictures. 20 years ago, did we have that? No. I think a lot of our business procedures probably have been the same, somewhat. I know we did change the bylaws a little bit, but it’s still generally the same concept. NEMLA is the regional chapter of the Music Library Association. But I feel like we’re getting more innovative and certainly getting better as we age.

DM: Is there anything else you would like to add about your association with NEMLA?

JH: Well, there was one other time I remember quite fondly; there was a meeting, it was held over at the Boston Symphony Orchestra. We had the meeting–had, you know, business meetings and whatnot–and then–we were there, I believe, on a Friday afternoon–and the symphony had a rehearsal. So we got to go sit in, and I just remember sitting there thinking, “This is fabulous, I’m getting paid to hear the symphony.”

DM: (laughs) How lucky was that?

JH: Yeah. But yeah, NEMLA is just really a great organization and it’s very easy to get started with and get involved with. There are always many opportunities, they’re always looking for people to join committees, you know. And just like, I just–all of a sudden, you know, I was just a regular member for a couple of years and the next thing I knew I was the chair. So, it can happen to anybody!

NEMLA Officers

Chair:
Jared Rex
Music Librarian
Fenwick Music Library
College of the Holy Cross
1 College Street
Worcester, MA 01610
jrex at holycross.edu
(508) 793-2295

Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect:
Marci Cohen
Assistant Head
Music Library
Boston University
771 Commonwealth Ave.
Boston, MA 02215
mcohen2 at bu.edu
(617) 353-3707

Past Chair:
Laura Stokes
Performing Arts Librarian
Orwig Music Library
Brown University
Providence, RI 02912
laura_stokes at brown.edu
(401) 863-3999

Secretary-Treasurer:
Alan Karass
Director of Libraries
New England Conservatory
290 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115-5018
alan.karass at necmusic.edu
(617) 585-1247

Member-At-Large:
Jonathan Manton
Music Librarian for Access Services
Irving S. Gilmore Music Library
Yale University
120 High Street
PO Box 208240
New Haven, CT 06520
jonathan.manton at yale.edu
(203) 432-5549

Newsletter Editor:
Memory Apata
Music Library Supervisor|Education & Outreach
Dartmouth College
Paddock Music Library
Hopkins Center, HB 6245 Hanover, NH 03755
memory.r.apata at dartmouth.edu
(603) 646-3234

NEMLA Archivist:
Sofia Becerra-Licha
Archivist
Stan Getz Library
Berklee College of Music
1140 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02215
sbecerralicha at berklee.edu
Office: (617)747-8001

Web Page Editor:
Sarah Hunter
Electronic Inventory Manager
Mugar Library
Boston University
771 Commonwealth Ave.
Boston, MA 02215
shunter at bu.edu
Office: (617) 353-5810

Publication Information:

New England Quarter Notes is published quarterly in September, December, March/April and June/July.
Back issues may be accessed from:
http://nemla.musiclibraryassoc.org/resources/newsletters/

Address all correspondence concerning editorial matters to:
Memory Apata
memory.r.apata at dartmouth.edu

Inquiries concerning subscription, membership and change of address should be directed to:
Alan Karass
alan.karass at necmusic.edu

Membership year runs September to August.
Regular Personal Membership:$12.00
Student and Retired Membership:$6.00
Institutional Membership$16.00

Save

NEW ENGLAND QUARTER NOTES: JULY 2017, NO. 194

Message from the Chair
Spring 2017 Meeting Summary
Secretary/Treasurer’s Report
Fall 2016 Meeting Preview
Noteworthy News
NEMLA Officers
Publication Information

Message from the Chair:

Dear NEMLA members,

It is an honor to greet you as the new Chair of NEMLA! I would like to begin by thanking our outgoing Past Chair, Zoe Rath, for her contributions to our organization over the past three years. Zoe’s knowledge of the inner-workings of NEMLA has been invaluable to me, and she will be missed. I would also like to thank our current Past Chair, Laura Stokes, for her creative and influential leadership over the last year. We are lucky that she will continue to serve membership for one final year as Past Chair! Other departing board members are Maryalice Perrin-Mohr, our past Newsletter Editor, and Sharon Saunders, our past Secretary-Treasurer. Maryalice’s astute proofreading abilities and Sharon’s initiatives in streamlining and documenting activities of her position to ease personnel transitions are much appreciated. I am pleased to welcome three new officers: Marci Cohen, Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect; Alan Karass, Secretary-Treasurer; and Memory Apata, Newsletter Editor. Congratulations on your appointments, and I look forward to working with you!

For those who attended our spring meeting at MIT in June, we are indebted to the efforts of our host Peter Munstedt and his stellar staff, our Program Committee, and the roster of outstanding presenters. From the special concert of works by composer Charles Shadle to the high-quality reception, it was a memorable event and special way to end the academic year. For those members who were unable to attend, Jonathan Manton has written a thorough recap of our meeting below. As always, we will post videos of the meeting’s sessions—and, for the first time, our closing concert—to our YouTube channel as they become available.

In August, the NEMLA Board will have our annual meeting at the College of the Holy Cross. The board will discuss the future of our chapter which includes strategic planning and brainstorming about how we can continue to serve our membership to the best of our ability. I look forward to welcoming all of our board members from across New England to participate in a day devoted to NEMLA. Expect a recap of our meeting in the fall newsletter.

Marci Cohen has already started preparations for our fall meeting with the help of new program committee members Carolyn Johnson and Jenée Force. We are especially grateful to Jonathan Manton, Ruthann McTyre, and the rest of the staff at Yale for enthusiastically agreeing to host our upcoming fall meeting. As the date approaches, be sure to read the fall meeting preview section of the newsletter for more specific details about our fall meeting. In case you missed it, the Program Committee has already opened the call for proposals. We want to hear from you about your projects and initiatives, so please consider submitting a proposal!

Speaking of the fall meeting, I hope you are able to join us at Yale on Friday, October 20, 2017! If you are interested in attending a NEMLA meeting for the first time, we have a First-Time Attendees Program which provides funding for appropriate travel expenses. More information will be announced as it becomes available.

As summer begins to wind down, I hope everyone is able to experience a much-needed reprieve from our busy lives. I personally find New England’s summer weather to be gorgeous, and the abundance of summer musical events in our region is unbeatable!

Respectfully submitted,
Jared Rex, Chair
New England Music Library Association

Spring 2017 Meeting Summary:

The Spring Meeting of the New England Chapter of the Music Library Association was held at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on June 2nd, 2017.
A total of 68 attendees, including a number of first time attendees, were greeted by NEMLA Chair (now Past Chair) Laura Stokes, and then welcomed to MIT by Chris Bourg, Director of MIT Libraries. Bourg noted that through her work overseeing two music libraries during her career, first at Stanford and now at MIT, she has come to consider music libraries to be the “bellwether” for research libraries, principally as technology has always gone hand in hand with music libraries. She highlighted how sound recordings, a major component of most music library collections, have always required technology in order to provide any sort of access to them. Bourg also noted how the Lewis Music Library at MIT exemplified what she called a “third space” for patrons, between work and home, something she is keen to provide across MIT Libraries.

Following Chris Bourg’s inspiring words, we dived straight into our first presentation, “Podcasting for Libraries”, by James Capobianco and Hannah Spencer Ferello from Houghton Library at Harvard University. Christina Linklater, who was also part of the project, was unfortunately not able to make it to the meeting in person. The presentation focused on a project Houghton had recently completed, in conjunction with Houghton’s 75th anniversary celebrations, to create a series of podcasts featuring Harvard faculty discussing their favorite items from the library’s special collections. The project team walked us through the methodology and equipment used to produce the highly impressive podcasts.

Jared Rex, NEMLA Chair, introduces James Capobianco and Hannah Ferello of Harvard. Photo courtesy of Marci Cohen.

Next, Alan Karass, Director of Libraries at New England Conservatory of Music (NEC), outlined his work with The Folk Song Society of Greater Boston (FSSGB). Alan discussed the history of the FSSGB and the Society’s library, which contains books, recordings (both commercial and non-commercial), concert posters/flyers and ephemera dating back to the founding of the Society in 1959. Numerous librarians had curated and maintained the FSSGB over the years. However, the collection had no permanent home, moving from place to place over the years, normally kept at the librarian’s house. Following a long lunch with members of the FSSGB Library Committee, which included an amazing Black Bean soup according to Alan, hence the name of his talk (A Tale of Tunebooks, Black Bean Soup, & Lawyers: The Folk Song Society of Greater Boston & the New England Conservatory), an agreement was made that the FSSGB library would be donated to NEC, along with an endowment that is being used for further collection development, digitization, preservation and cataloging. The first installment of the donation was made in May 2016, with further donations due in the near future.

The last session before lunch featured a panel of public librarians: Elizabeth Berndt-Morris from Boston Public Library; Cathy Balshone from Newton Free Library and Raminta Moore from Portland Public Library. The panel shared a fascinating insight into recent trends related to music collections in public libraries. In relation to services, much of the discussion focused on sound recordings, notably the difference between Compact Disc (CD) borrowing and online e-resource access, principally via Alexander Street Press and/or Hoopla, a service tailored to public libraries that enables borrowing of digital music, movies and ebooks. CD borrowing remains surprisingly high at all three of the libraries discussed, notably at Portland Public Library where Raminta has built a Maine Music Collection, featuring recordings from local  musicians. CD circulation has increased fivefold since this collection was established. When it came to e-resources, all panelists noted that Hoopla was extremely popular with patrons, but that the cost to the library for the service was becoming unsustainable. Hoopla employs a cost per use model, so the more popular the resource becomes, the more expensive it is for the library. An additional area of discussion for the panel was programming, which continues to be a major focus at all three libraries. Each panelist highlighted extensive music programs at their libraries, and noted that providing performance opportunities and spaces notably increased local community engagement with the library.

After lunch and the annual NEMLA Business Meeting, Anna Kijas, Senior Digital Scholarship Librarian, and Elizabeth Sweeney, Irish Music Librarian, from Boston College presented “Providing Open Access to Irish Music: The Séamus Connolly Collection of Irish Music at Boston College”. The collection features traditional tunes and songs collected by the fiddle player Séamus Connolly (Sullivan Artist in Residence in Irish Music at Boston College from 2004 to 2015). It includes 330 audio recordings featuring more than 130 musicians, with accompanying stories, transcriptions, and introductory essays. Anna outlined how the project to create a freely available online portal for the collection was developed by first creating a detailed project charter, which included the scope, goals, content, team, assigned roles, sources of support, timeline and accountability for the project. Anna outlined the significant benefit of creating a charter for such projects, which she noted can be flexible and revised as the project progresses. The portal was built using Omeka, and utilized SoundCloud for audio playback. Elizabeth noted that most of the audio recordings are new or modern interpretations, as the process of clearing all of the permissions for the numerous existent recordings of the tunes featured would have been beyond the resources of the project. Elizabeth also outlined a policy which the project created for reviews and integrating submitted corrections.

The final presentation of the day was by Michael Scott Cuthbert, Associate Professor of Music at MIT. “Searching in Digital Medieval Score Databases: Moving from Metadata to Big Data”. Michael outlined his work on the Electronic Medieval Music Score Archive Project (EMMSAP), a repository containing over 1500 polyphonic works, written between 1300-1430, that he had encoded in MusicXML. Michael has created Music21 based tools that enable him to analyze these works as a corpus. His principal objective in doing so is to find previously unknown connections between the works. Michael utilized numerous incipits for this project, that he then encoded into MusicXML, which he sourced from the Répertoire International des Sources Musicales (RISM).

Composer Charles Shadle applauds baritone Bradford Gleim following their performance of “Einstein and Music.” Photo courtesy of Zoe Rath.

After a full day of excellent presentations, we were then treated to a wonderful concert featuring works by Charles Shadle, Senior Lecturer for Composition and Theory at MIT, followed by a reception at Lewis Music Library.

Reception following concert. Photo courtesy of Zoe Rath.

A huge debt of gratitude goes to Chris Bourg, Peter Mundst and the staff of the Lewis Music Library at MIT for hosting us, along with Jared Rex and Marci Cohen, who took care of all of the arrangements for the meeting. I look forward to seeing everyone at Yale in the Fall!
Submitted by Jonathan Manton, NEMLA Member-at-Large.

Secretary/Treasurer’s Report

Balances (June 1, 2017) 
Savings $4,005.33
Checking $2,750.70
Total $6,756.03
Oral history grant
Beginning amount $1,000.00
expense (3/2015) $183.00
expenses (7/2015) $336.50
expense (11/2016) $282.16
expense (5/2017) $24.99
current remaining $173.35
Checking account
 Restricted funds (grant) $173.35
 Unrestricted/NEMLA (non-grant) $2,577.35
Total $2750.70
 Members (57 current members)              
 Income from memberships paid this report period (6/1/2016-6/1/2017) $851.04
 June 2016 meeting        
 Expenses $246.19
 First-time attendees $137.75
 Registrations $832.44
 October 2016 meeting
 Expenses $565.96
 First-time attendees $196.57
 Registrations $520.23
 Fees
 Eventbrite (meeting registrations) $149.33
 Paypal (memberships paid online) $28.96

 

Fall Meeting Preview:

Yale University

New Haven, CT

Friday, October 20, 2017

Beinecke Library at Yale.  Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=904507

The NEMLA Fall 2017 meeting will be held at Yale University Library.  All sessions will be held in the International Room within Sterling Memorial Library. In addition to presentations, the meeting will include a tour of the Gilmore Music Library, which underwent extensive renovation in 2016; an opportunity to view the rich musical holdings held at the Beinecke Library, ranging from the 15th-century Mellon Chansonnier to a manuscript of Mahler’s Symphony No. 1, that includes a movement that the composer later decided to omit; and a concert performance by Anne Rhodes, featuring songs found within the Gilmore Music Library’s Special Collections. The day will end with a reception at Mory’s, the famous Yale Tavern that has been frequented by countless Yale Alum, including notably Cole Porter, whose initials can be seen carved into one of the tables in the main dining room!

Presentation proposals will be accepted through August 4, 2017.  Please send proposals and questions via e-mail to the Program Committee by emailing Marci Cohen (mcohen2@bu.edu). In your submission e-mail, please use the subject line: “NEMLA Fall 2017 Proposal.”

More details on the meeting including hotel information, etc. will be forthcoming.

Committees seeking new members:

The Programming Committee is seeking one new member. If interested contact Marci Cohen via email: mcohen2 at bu.edu

The Nominating Committee is seeking two new members. If interested contact Laura Stokes via email:  laura_stokes at brown.edu

Noteworthy News:

PamJuenglingS6A8982

Pam Juengling will retire from the University of Massachusetts/Amherst on August 30, 2017.  Pam joined UMass/Amherst as Music Librarian in 1982.  Prior to her arrival at UMass, she earned her degree in organ performance, music education, and German at Minnesota State University-Mankato. A sign posted in the music library window advertising a student position in the music library inspired a shift in her career focus from church music and teaching to music librarianship, and the path was set! She attended library school in a joint program at SUNY-Geneseo and the Eastman School of Music, earning her M.L.S. in 1978. She worked at Northern Kentucky University in suburban Cincinnati before coming to UMass.  Pam was involved with numerous major changes in the fields of music and librarianship, especially the impact of technology and the transition from analog to digital formats and card catalogs to online catalogs.  She saw the move of the UMass Music Library from a branch library in the Fine Arts Center to a department within the main library.  During retirement she looks forward to travel, more time with family and friends, volunteer activities, reading and knitting, and attending the wealth of concerts, exhibits, and lectures in the Five College area and beyond.

Publication Information:

New England Quarter Notes is published quarterly in September, December, March/April and June/July.
Back issues may be accessed from:

Newsletter Back Issues

Address all correspondence concerning editorial matters to:
Memory Apata, memory.r.apata at Dartmouth.edu

Inquiries concerning subscription, membership and change of address should be directed to:
Alan Karass, alan.karass at necmusic.edu

Membership year runs September to August.
Regular Personal Membership:$12.00
Student and Retired Membership:$6.00
Institutional Membership$16.00

NEMLA Officers

Chair:
Jared Rex
Music Librarian
Fenwick Music Library
College of the Holy Cross
1 College Street
Worcester, MA 01610
jrex at holycross.edu
(508) 793-2295

Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect:
Marci Cohen
Assistant Head
Music Library
Boston University
771 Commonwealth Ave.
Boston, MA 02215
mcohen2 at bu.edu
(617) 353-3707

Past Chair:
Laura Stokes
Performing Arts Librarian
Orwig Music Library
Brown University
Providence, RI 02912
laura_stokes at brown.edu
(401) 863-3999

Secretary-Treasurer:
Alan Karass
Director of Libraries
New England Conservatory
290 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115-5018
alan.karass at necmusic.edu
(617) 585-1247

Member-At-Large:
Jonathan Manton
Music Librarian for Access Services
Irving S. Gilmore Music Library
Yale University
120 High Street
PO Box 208240
New Haven, CT 06520
jonathan.manton at yale.edu
(203) 432-5549

Newsletter Editor:
Memory Apata
Music Library Supervisor|Education & Outreach
Dartmouth College
Paddock Music Library
Hopkins Center, HB 6245 Hanover, NH 03755
memory.r.apata at dartmouth.edu
(603) 646-3234

NEMLA Archivist:
Sofia Becerra-Licha
Archivist
Stan Getz Library
Berklee College of Music
1140 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02215
sbecerralicha at berklee.edu
Office: (617)747-8001

Web Page Editor:
Sarah Hunter
Electronic Inventory Manager
Mugar Library
Boston University
771 Commonwealth Ave.
Boston, MA 02215
shunter at bu.edu
Office: (617) 353-5810

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